Posted By: Chad AshleyGreyscalegorilla

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What Renderer Should I Use In Cinema 4D?

August 14, 2017 - By 

With so many different options to choose from, what renderer is the best one to use for your final render out of Cinema 4D?

There is no magic answer and in some ways that’s perfect. Some render engines are better for certain tasks. Below is a list of a few that we recommend and what their pros and cons are.

The Goal Of This Post

The goal of this article is to help motion designers and 3D artists make an informed decision on what renderer they would most benefit from.

What are the criteria? Glad you asked! All opinions assume you want to make photo real animations in a production environment with little to no problems. So each one is looked at through a production final-frame render lens.

Why listen to us?

We have over 40 years of combined experience with 3D rendering. Our creative director Chad Ashley has tried most of these personally and has used many of them in production. Our goal is to give you the right information to help you make the right decision for you and your team.

We understand there is confusion in the rendering space, and we are here to share what we know and what we’ve found.

The Short Answer

As of August 10th, 2017 this is our opinion of the current “Render Wars” and what we think is best for most artists. (stay tuned as I expect these recommendations to change from time to time)

For those who are ready for a GPU renderer that’s production focused: Redshift

If you or your studio have already made the jump to GPU rendering and have outfitted your workstations with multiple Nvidia GPU’s then I can firmly recommend Redshift as the best solution for you at this time.

For those dedicated to CPU or who have a deep appreciation for features/scalability: Arnold

For those of you still on the Mac platform or who have already invested heavily in CPU machines/farms, I recommend using Arnold as your primary renderer.

But let’s take a closer look at what may or may not be right for you.


Physical Renderer

Pros:

  • Built into the core of Cinema 4D
  • Ton’s of tutorials
  • Good representation of materials in the viewport
  • Great for stills
  • Reflectance is quite robust
  • Excellent noise maps

Cons:

  • Slow
  • No IPR,
  • Lacks strong pass (AOV) system
  • No node material editor
  • No curvature map (though inverse AO is close)
  • No tri-planar map
  • Not receiving regular updates
  • Lights are in need of serious upgrade
  • No dome light
  • IBL workflow is cumbersome

Who is Physical Renderer Good For?

I suggest you stick with Physical if you are tied down by hardware/OS and haven’t a budget to upgrade to anything else. It’s also entirely satisfactory if you don’t find yourself rendering any complex photo-realistic animations on a regular basis. It’s quite adequate on stills and can even handle distributed rendering with Team Render to Picture Viewer.

Check out some of our favorite Physical Tutorials


 

Arnold by Solid Angle / Autodesk

Pros:

  • Killer development team
  • Deep feature set
  • Custom AOV’s (Arbitrary Output Variables aka passes)
  • Light Groups
  • LPE (light path expressions)
  • frequent C4D plugin updates
  • simple settings
  • x-particle support
  • supports both Mac/PC
  • same engine in multiple host applications
  • scalability, stability
  • Many speed enhancing short-cuts and workflows

Cons:

  • Expensive (compared to competitors)
  • Confusing license system
  • CPU only
  • Slow compared to most GPU renderers
  • owned by Autodesk (bad track record of acquisitions)
  • poor choice for interior rendering
  • caustics are weak

Who is Arnold Good For?

I recommend it to those individuals/studios who demand high-quality images and who value stability. Arnold is also perfect for those who are not quite ready for GPU rendering but are looking for something beyond the Physical renderer in Cinema 4D. It’s also ideal for individuals or studios that have not yet made the switch to PC as Arnold will run on either Mac or PC. If you are an individual artist or a studio running lots of different sort of jobs (volumes, particles, large data sets) Arnold is the right choice for you. If you are studio with mixed 3D host applications Arnold’s proprietary .ass format is interchangeable which can be a great benefit. Arnold coupled with render farm solutions out there such as Pixel Plow is a potent combination. Arnold and cloud rendering gives small studios and independent artists as much firepower as most large studios. Arnold is one of my most recommended renderers.

Check out some of our favorite Arnold Tutorials

UPDATE: 08.22.17 Solid Angle announced new pricing on five packs of Arnold plus free licenses for educational institutions.


Octane by Otoy

Pros:

  • Easy photorealism
  • IPR Speed
  • IPR window features
  • speed of rendering (up to a certain level of complexity)
  • simple settings
  • custom material node interface
  • Octane Scatter Utility
  • tri-planar mapping

Cons:

  • Limited by GPU memory
  • Stability
  • scalability
  • no custom AOVs
  • no light linking
  • inconsistent/delayed updates
  • limited maps/materials
  • layering multiple materials is cumbersome
  • “Octane Effect” (see GSG Podcast).

Who is Octane Good For?

I think Octane is perfect for an art-director that is designing frames or doing basic look dev. It’s fast IPR, and simple UI will make it easy for a designer to create imagery, given they have the GPU power to run it efficiently. I’ve seen Art Directors have great success with Octane. Do boards with Octane, then move to a production renderer to finish the job. Octane is also useful as a “daily render” tool. I’ve often joked on our podcast that Octane should have a “send to Instagram” button as it seems to be used more on that platform than any other. Not sure if that’s good or bad. Up to you, I guess. I should also add that Octane is a fine choice for those doing primarily exterior architecture renders.

Check out some of our favorite Octane Tutorials


Redshift

Pros:

  • Balances load between CPU and GPU
  • Very Fast
  • production focused features
  • biased engine
  • unified sampling
  • versatile uber shader
  • tons of map types
  • a responsive development team
  • Redshift Proxies/Instances
  • X-Particles support

Cons:

  • AOV workflow is convoluted (too many clicks)
  • no ability to texture lights beyond images
  • not as many useful utility nodes as other choices
  • no support for X-Particles trails (or splines at all)
  • higher learning curve

Who is Redshift Good For?

I recommend Redshift to anyone running Nvidia GPU’s and who is looking for a stable production renderer and isn’t afraid to jump into some settings to squeeze out every ounce of speed out of your frames. It’s very well rounded and versatile able to handle arch-viz interiors, intricate character work, product viz, or complex VFX.

Check out some of our favorite Redshift Tutorials


Cycles Render by Mario Tran Phuc

Cycles4D by Insydium

Pros:

  • Works both on CPU and GPU
  • tons of features for rendering X-Particles
  • affordable
  • great node material editor
  • plenty of learning resources.

Cons:

  • Cycles is developed by the Blender Foundation and not Insydium. The open source nature can scare large studios who are looking for deep customer support and accountability. I’ve found that it also a bit cumbersome on seemingly simple shading/lighting tasks. AOV’s are also a bit lacking.

Who is Cycles4D Good For?

Anyone who’s work is primarily X-Particles based would benefit from Cycles4D. It’s CPU/GPU flexibility, and low price would make it an excellent choice for those on limited hardware/budget.

Check out some of our favorite Cycles4D Tutorials


“Want More To Read About This?”

We wrote an in-depth article over at Motionographer. If you’re still hungry for more information, go check it out!

“Why didn’t you mention My Favorite Renderer?”

If your renderer is not mentioned above, it’s either that we haven’t used it enough to form an educated opinion or we have used it and we don’t think it’s ready for use in production yet.


 


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Signal 1.5 Released

June 27, 2017 - By 

We are very excited to announce the latest update to our animation plugin Signal!

Version 1.5 brings some really awesome new features and bug-fixes. Most notable is the new BPM (Beats Per Minute) functionality. We hope you check out all the feature videos and see for yourself how Signal can improve your animation workflow.

Already own Signal?

Good news, you have access to Signal 1.5 right now! Just log into the customer area here and begin your download.

Don’t Own Signal? Let’s Change That!

Go grab it! But hey, don’t take our word for it. Look at what some Signal users have said about this update.

Signal’s BPM features deliver something that has been missing from Cinema since the birth of MoGraph

Greyscalegorilla’s recent BPM addition to Signal is a complete Game Changer. What would take an animator endless hours of keystrokes and key frames now takes a click, drag and your choice of tempo.
It’s the must have plugin for every animator using Cinema 4D.


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Half Rez Video: “The Past, Present, and Future of 3D ” with Chad Ashley

May 16, 2017 - By 

Watch Chad Ashley talk about the past present and future of 3D production. And, how he thinks the future may play out for 3D motion designers in the next few years.

This video was recorded during Half Rez 2016.
Half Rez is a conference to celebrate motion designers held in Chicago IL. Want to be at the next event?

Register For Half Rez 2017 Today!


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Cineversity Presents: C4DLive Presentations from NAB 2017

May 11, 2017 - By 

Thanks to our pals at Cineversity, we can now share ALL the amazing presentations that were given in Las Vegas at NAB 2017! We will be updating and adding videos to this page as they become available, so check back often! Thanks again to Maxon US and Cineversity.com for recording and publishing the NAB 2017 C4DLive Presentations. Enough talk, let’s get to the videos!


John Lepore: 5 “Wrong” Ways To Use Cinema 4D

NAB 2017 Rewind – John Lepore: 5 Wrong Ways To Use Cinema 4D from Cineversity.


Russ Gautier: Blockbuster FUI techniques in Cinema 4D


NAB 2017 Rewind – Russ Gautier: Blockbuster FUI techniques in Cinema 4D from Cineversity.


Robyn Haddow: Cinema 4D FUI in a Flash


NAB 2017 Rewind – Robyn Haddow: Cinema 4D FUI in a Flash from Cineversity.


Devon Ko: A Visual Playground for Artists and Designers

NAB 2017 Rewind – Devon Ko: 3D: A Visual Playground for Artists and Designers from Cineversity.


EJ Hassenfratz: How to make Cinema 4D an invaluable Part of your 2D Workflow

NAB 2017 Rewind – EJ Hassenfratz: 3D: How to Make Cinema 4D an Invaluable Part of Your 2D Workflow from .


Angie Ferret: Cinema 4D for Designers – Making the Transition

NAB 2017 Rewind – Angie Ferret: 3D: Cinema 4D for Designers – Making the Transition from Cineversity.


Patrick Longstreth

NAB 2017 Rewind – Patrick Longstreth: Visual Effects for Adam Ruins Everything from Cineversity.


Perry Harovas

NAB 2017 Rewind – Perry Harovas: C4D Is My Secret VFX Weapon: Confessions of a Former Maya User from Cineversity.


Matt Milstead

NAB 2017 Rewind – Matt Milstead: Motion Tracking with Cinema 4D from Cineversity.


Nick Campbell

NAB 2017 Rewind – Nick Campbell: 20 Speed Hacks Every New C4D User Should Know from Cineversity.


Eran Stern

NAB 2017 Rewind – Eran Stern: Combining C4D and After Effects for 3D Title Creation from Cineversity.


Al Heck

NAB 2017 Rewind – Al Heck: Create a Fantastic Freelance Career Using C4D from Cineversity.


Mike Schaeffer

NAB 2017 Rewind – Mike Schaeffer: Cinema 4D, from design and concept through final renders from Cineversity.


Ask GSG

NAB 2017 Rewind – Nick Campbell & Chris Schmidt: Ask GSG from Cineversity.


Lorcan O’Shanahan

NAB 2017 Rewind – Lorcan O’Shanahan: Brief explorations into parametric workflows from Cineversity.


Chad Ashley

NAB 2017 Rewind – Chad Ashley: 3D Workflow Techniques for Lazy People from Cineversity.


Chris Schmidt

NAB 2017 Rewind – Chris Schmidt: 50 Minutes of Tips and Tricks in Cinema 4D from Cineversity.


Dave Koss

NAB 2017 Rewind – Dave Koss: Time-Saving Project Management in Cinema 4D from Cineversity.


Julia Siemon

NAB 2017 Rewind – Julia Siemon: Character Tools for 3D Motion Graphic from Cineversity.


Athanasios Pozantzis

NAB 2017 Rewind – Athanasios Pozantzis: Organic Shape Morphing Inside Cinema 4D from Cineversity.


Brett Morris: Starting from Scratch, Creating the Cineversity Ident

Brett Morris: Starting from Scratch, Creating the Cineversity Ident from Cineversity.


Brett Morris: Building Custom Tools for Scalable Production Techniques

Brett Morris: Building Custom Tools for Scalable Production Techniques from Cineversity.



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The Beeple Interview! // Half Rez 2016

May 10, 2017 - By 

In this video, we sit down with Beeple AKA Mike Winkelmann to learn how he has made over 3500 daily renders! We also get his advice to others trying to start their own daily practice.

Register For Half Rez 2017 Today! http://www.halfrez.com/

Visit Beeple’s Site – http://beeple-crap.com/

Unfortunately, some of the video was not recorded during this interview. To hear the entire unedited interview, please listen to the full version at our Greyscalegorilla Podcast.

 


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