Posted By: Chad AshleyGreyscalegorilla

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David Ariew Creates Stunning Space Music Vid with the help of Signal

February 8, 2017 - By 

Charlottesville VA native and talented C4D freelancer David Ariew recently traveled to outer space. David was not truly in the stratosphere, but he did create an amazing music video for “A Bad Think” created entirely in C4D with Otoy’s Octane Renderer.

David also used one of our tools, which made us very proud. David used Signal to help him with all those beautiful flickering lights. Here is what David had to say about his experience with Signal:

“I really wanted to create a run-down looking space station to complement the melancholy vibe of the song, and having the lights flicker both brought life into the static scenes and created a moody feel. GSG Signal allowed me to create that animation procedurally, with no keyframes, and there’s even a flicker preset under the Signal scripts folder! Then it was just a matter of linking the power of the light to the blank Signal tag, and increasing the strength and variation until the power hit the zero mark on occasion.”

David was also nice enough to record a quick video demonstrating his blinking light technique with Signal and Octane.

You can learn more about our Signal Plugin here.


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Guest Daily Render Artist: Rick Lundskow

February 2, 2017 - By 

 

Rick Lundskow aka @lundskow

We’d like to welcome Daily Render Guest Artist Rick Lundskow @lundskow to our ongoing series of awesomeness.

Follow the GSG Daily Render Series on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr


What is your name, position, and where do you currently work?

Rick Lundskow

Art Director

Cornerstone Church

 

How did you get into Cinema 4D?

I’m almost positive I saw a motion graphics video on vimeo back in 2010/2011. It was so impactful that I wanted to learn how to create art like it. I immediately downloaded the trial version and started watching Greyscalegorilla tutorials. After the trial expired I used the demo version. The demo wouldn’t let you save or render out projects, which was a slight bummer because some of the pieces were sweet. However, I could recreate them if I really wanted them.

Once I moved to Michigan to work at Cornerstone, I budgeted for Cinema 4d Studio. That’s when the real fun began.

 

When did you start your daily render practice?

I tried to start daily renders but they took too much time or I ran out of ideas too quickly. I got in my head too much… Each piece had to be amazing, but often times they were not great by any stretch of the imagination.

At Half Rez this past year I had a chance to talk to Beeple, the master of daily renders. He really encouraged me that it wasn’t as big of a deal as I was making it out to be. I just needed to make something happen. I don’t know what it was, but it clicked in my brain and I started the next day, September 15th.

What is the hardest part about doing a daily render?

Time would probably be the most difficult part of a daily render for me. Some nights I don’t get home until 10pm-12am and I haven’t even started on my project. The worst is when I get home late and I don’t even have a concept. On those nights, I wanted to give up. And there were many of those nights. However I’m sure other people have had that same exact excuse but have continued anyway. So I told myself that I couldn’t have any excuses for missing a day.

 

What have you learned by making something every day?

Probably the most significant thing I’ve learned is lighting and reflections. Lighting can make or break your render, so I experimented with different techniques until I found something that works for me. Since I don’t have a fancy render (which might change very soon), I wanted to learn the most with the tools that I had on hand.

As far a basic life skills go, I learned that I can put too much pressure on the creativity. I want the design to be better than the day before it, or create a compelling piece that will sell to millions of people. The former is stressful and the latter hasn’t happened yet. Daily renders are more like experiments. No pressure on the outcome. You try an idea that doesn’t work, but you fix those mistakes the next day and publish your findings. It’s important for me to realize that when I fail, I just found another way of not doing something.

What Hardware and Software do you use to make your work?

I do most of my work on a 2012 MacBook Pro. Nothing too fancy about it but it gets the job done. If I stay late at work, or have some free time over lunch, I’ll create piece on my Mac Pro with 12GB of ram. Then render it out using Team Render across 3-4 of the other machines in the office.

Aside from using Cinema, I use Illustrator a lot to create splines. The shape builder inside Illustrator is incredibly powerful for making custom shapes for lathes, sweeps, and extrudes. I recently purchased ZBrush core. While Cinema’s sculpting tools are great, there were a few features about ZBrush that made it easier to sculpt heads.

 

What is your day to day like at work?

My work schedule changes on a daily basis. I tend to have a theme to each week day though. Mondays are meeting days. A nice easy transition into the work week. Tuesdays are typically my big project day. I can get the most done without a ton of distractions. Wednesdays are a big filming day. We do video announcements in our Sunday services and we record & edit them mid-week. Thursdays are the busiest days because we’re trying to finish the work week strong. So I’ll finish projects that I didn’t quite complete the other work days. Coffee is a requirement for Thursdays. The great thing about my job is that I don’t work Fridays. Actually, I don’t think I’ve had a job in the past 10 years that required me to work Fridays. It’s pretty amazing.

Anything advice to anyone out there just getting started?

Great art isn’t about having the best resources, it’s about using what you have. There’s something special about taking what little resources you do have to create something beautiful. It gives you an appreciation for the things around you. When you hit a roadblock, figure a way around it. Don’t let circumstances hold you back from accomplishing what you want to do.

Also, don’t make it more complicated than it needs to be. Start with a 5 minute idea and work from there. Most of my projects come from a small element I see in my day to day world. Find something that inspires you and run with that idea.

 

Where can people learn more about you?

I’m currently rebuilding my website from scratch, so currently I don’t have more info available.


 


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HDRI Studio Rig 2.142 Update

December 15, 2016 - By 


Attention HDRI Studio Rig Customers:

Update to HDRI Studio & Browser to version 2.142
New Features:
  • HDRI Studio’s Icon can be double clicked in the Object Manager to open HDRI Browser quickly.
  • New “Show all” feature in HDRI Browser to view every single HDRI in your collection at one time.
  • HDRI Browser remembers all settings when layout is saved
  • HDRI Studio and Browser are now compatible with Cinema 4D’s Take system so you can quickly iterate through different looks.
  • In R18 HDRI Browser loads the low-res version of the selected HDRI into the viewports “Environmental override” channel. This allows a realtime preview of the HDRI in the viewport when OpenGL with Reflections is turned on.
  • HDRI Browser can be linked to remote “Packs” folder via the “Change Directory” option. This allows for a large collection of HDRIs to live on a different drive and for multiple versions of C4D to share the same folder saving you from having to duplicate potentially tens of gigabits worth of HDRIs
Bug Fixes:
  • R18 Reflective floor bug fixed
HDRI Expansion Pack Customers note:

In this update you may notice that your HDRI Expansion pack names have changed and now match what is found in our online store. We apologize in advance if this change causes any missing texture errors, however they are easily remedied by re-selecting the appropriate HDRI in the Browser. This new naming system will allow for us to create a better on-going experience for our customers.

If you own HDRI Studio Rig, you can download your update in the customer area. Don’t own it? We can fix that! Check it out here!


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Pixel Plow gets GSG Certified

October 7, 2016 - By 

We are happy to announce that cloud rendering company Pixel Plow is now officially GSG Certified!


Who is Pixel Plow?

Pixel Plow is a cloud rendering service that is based in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve been watching them for some time and have continuously been impressed with their service in both terms of speed and cost efficiency.

Here is how they describe themselves, “During our search for a good render farm service, we began taking a critical look at how other farms operated. We quickly discovered several ways to increase accessibility, affordability, and security in every aspect of your render farm experience. Pixel Plow is the continuation of our effort to provide this experience in a simple, competitive package.  With thousands of clients in over 65 countries around the world, Pixel Plow is quickly becoming a dominant force in the cloud rendering industry.”


What does GSG Certified mean?

In a nutshell, it means that we fully endorse Pixel Plow. First off, we have made sure all our products work in their system so you don’t have to worry whether or not they have our plugins installed. Secondly, we believe Pixel Plow offers a top-of-class cloud rendering product for the best price. Many times in our testing, Pixel Plow would be even more cost effective than an Amazon EC2 system of similar specs!


Why  Pixel Plow?

  • Greyscalegorilla tools are fully supported. No more worrying about what cloud rendering solution has all of our tools.
  • Pixel Plow supports both Physical AND Arnold.
  • Ease of use: We think cloud rendering should be as simple as possible. We also think cloud rendering shouldn’t be stressful or complicated.
  • Affordability: Pixel Plow’s unique “Power Level” setting allows you to adjust the potential cost of your render. Making it fit within most budgets. We think cloud rendering should be affordable for all.
  • Great Support: Pixel Plow is based in the USA so you can usually get support quickly and not have to worry about things getting lost in translation.
  • NO FTP NEEDED: Pixel Plow will write image files directly to your system. No FTP’ing back and forth. Yay!

 

 


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GSG Podcast Ep. 005: C4D Layouts, AskGSG, And The Take System

October 3, 2016 - By 

GSG Podcast Ep. 005

In this podcast, the GSG team discusses their favorite ways to customize Cinema 4D, season three of AskGSG, and the Cinema 4D Take System. Enjoy!



 

Show Notes/Links:

Ask GSG Season 3 Starting Soon on Twitch
HDRI Link – Coming Soon
Customizing C4D Palates
Learn the Take/Tokens Systems everybody

Brograph Podcast – http://brograph.com/podcast/
Windows Utilities Video – https://greyscalegorilla.com/tutorials/top-five-free-windows-utilities-for-motion-designers/
CV ToolBox – https://www.cineversity.com/vidplaytut/cv_toolbox
Active Solo – https://nitro4d.com/product/magic-solo/
Magic Anim Curve – https://nitro4d.com/product/magic-animcurve/
Digital Kitchen – http://thisisdk.com/
Set A Custom Layout With New.c4d – https://greyscalegorilla.com/tutorials/cinema-4d-quick-tip-2-make-a-custom-new-scenefile-new-c4d/

Shift C – https://vimeo.com/49187251
SSS Balls Beeple – https://www.instagram.com/p/BK3IftsB2mt/?taken-by=beeple_crap


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