Posted In:Design | Greyscalegorilla

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Exclusive New Pro Training and Last Chance Savings | Greyscalegorilla Plus

October 18, 2019 - By 

Here is your Fall 2019 Greyscalegorilla Plus update, featuring all the new training and downloads that members can access now and in the coming months.

When Greyscalegorilla Plus was first conceived, the goal was to bring you all of Greyscalegorilla’s industry-leading professional training series in one place at one low price. Starting with the Guides to Cinema 4D, Redshift, X-Particles, and other pro training series, Greyscalegorilla Plus quickly became a platform where we could give members so much more.

Today, not only can you stream the training guides and exclusive new training series, members also get access to our popular drag-and-drop material collections. All of our material collections will be in Greyscalegorilla Plus before the end of the year, and even more assets and downloads are on the way.

Render via Zachary Corzine’s Procedural Systems.

Greyscalegorilla Plus is growing at a rapid pace, and things are not slowing down anytime soon. The team just introduced new Head of Plus, Todd Blankenship, who will oversee the release of new training series, downloads, and more.

He has already put together a new quick overview of Greyscalegorilla Plus so he can introduce himself and show you what’s already inside.

Take of tour of Greyscalegorilla Plus by clicking here to checkout the lesson previews

Join before October 31st, and you will get over $1500 in pro training and product downloads for only $348. That’s just $29 a month. The price goes up on November 1st, so don’t miss out. Head over to the Greyscalegorilla Plus page to join, and use discount code NEW2PLUS at checkout to save $120.

Curious to know what is coming to Greyscalegorilla Plus? Let’s dive into a few of the Fall 2019 releases Read More


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Beeple Reveals Everyday Secrets and Shows His Daily C4D Process

July 9, 2019 - By 
Beeple Reveals Everyday Secrets and Shows His Daily C4D Process - Featured

Mike Winkelmann, AKA Beeple, shares insight to his daily creative process and offers tips and tricks for 3D artists of all levels.

For the uninitiated, Beeple is a 3D artist and motion designer who has reached legendary status for his daily creations. He helped grow the “everyday” movement which inspires artists to create new pieces of work everyday so they can continue to grow their skills. To date, Beeple has created over 4400 daily renders.

His work has been featured in places like the Louis Vuitton runway and was recently admired on the Joe Rogan Experience podcast.

Read More


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Listen to This: Best Creative Podcasts for Motion Designers and 3D Artists

April 2, 2019 - By 
Listen to This: Best Creative Podcasts for Motion Designers and 3D Artists - Featured

These are the podcasts that motion designers, 3D artists, and creatives should be listening to.

Listen to and subscribe to the great podcasts that will help you find inspiration, get advice, learn tips and tricks, and so much more.

The Collective Podcast

The Collective Podcast with Ash Thorp is a bi-weekly series that dives into all things creative. Now with over 200 episodes, the podcast features interviews with many of the best designers, illustrators, VFX artists, writers, painters, and programmers. They talk about the struggles of work/live balance, past projects, and their own experiences in the professional creative industry.

Listen to the Collective Podcast: thecollectivepodcast.com


School of Motion Podcast

The School of Motion podcast is hosted by founder Joey Korenman. On this show, you’ll hear about all things related to motion graphics. Joey interviews tons of amazing artists, School of Motion alumni, and industry professionals. Read More


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‘Vaportecture’ is the Often Hilarious Insanity of Arch Viz Renders

March 27, 2019 - By 
'Vaportecture' is the Often Hilarious Insanity of Arch Viz Renders - Featured

The long tradition of building stadium marketing buzz at the expense of physics and reality, vaportecture is the craziest form of Arch Viz.

Writer and editor Neil deMause has coined the term “vaportecture” to describe the incredibly unrealistic and cheesy arch viz renders most often associated with new sports stadiums and arenas.

In his Deadspin article, The 7 Laws Of Vaportecture, Stadium Art’s Fever Dream, Neil deMause talks about the insane physics-defying things you often see in stadium renders. Things like fireworks lighting up a daytime sky, lens flares galore, and semi-transparent fans never over-crowding a food line.

Fireworks will never see the light of day in San Diego from this abandoned project. Render via MANICA Architecture.

Now, it should be said that they whole point of these renders are to excite fan bases and cities into buying new stadiums, even though the practice itself has often come at the expense of taxpayers to benefit team owners.

These 3D renders are not supposed to be photoreal, but are really more akin to propaganda in the fact that the point is to solicit a response from the general public. It’s a process I’m all to familiar with, living in a city that is constantly building lavish new stadiums and home of one of the largest architectural design firms. Read More


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Allegorithmic’s Substance is Coming to the Adobe Creative Cloud

January 23, 2019 - By 

Adobe Acquires Allegorithmic, the makers of Substance. This brings one of the industry’s best tools in creating 3D textures and materials to the Creative Cloud.

Adobe is taking a huge step into 3D with this acquisition. While Adobe’s 3D offering Dimension bridges a gap for 2D artists, it has not been largely adopted by the professional 3D market. However, Allegorithmic’s Substance has become a standard tool among many 3D artists and studios in a variety of industries, so the move is a big play to bring those users into the Adobe Creative Cloud. Read More


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The Legendary 12 Principles of Animation

October 9, 2018 - By 

A wonderful look into Disney’s Twelve Principles of Animation, and how to apply these techniques to your motion design work.

Ollie and Frank via Neville Marriner / Daily Mail / Shutterstock.

When it comes to deep dives into what makes animation great, I am a sucker for books, video essays, and breakdowns. I’ve devoured countless hours on the history of animation, as well as VFX and filmmaking in general.

While I may enjoy a read through Ed Catmull’s Creativity, Inc. or deep studies of The VES Handbook of Visual Effects (both on the shelf next to me), I just absolutely love watching a well paced and extensive video essay. One of the best at the video essay genre is the great kaptainkristian.

Disney’s 12 Principles of Animation

Though often credited to Walt Disney himself, the 12 principles are actually the brain child of Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston. They were two of Disney’s Nine Old Men.

Read More


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Cineversity Tutorial: Commercial Production Workflows for Freelancers

June 29, 2018 - By 
Cineversity Tutorial: Commercial Production Workflows for Freelancers - Featured

Master your Cinema 4D workflow with these great tips and tools that designer Zachary Corzine uses on his projects for Audi, Odwalla, and Del Taco.

After talking about tips and tricks for freelancers working remotely with the The Freelancer’s Guide to Surviving and Thriving When Working At Home, let’s hop into this great presentation on the commercial production workflow for freelancers from Zach Corzine.

You may recall Corzine’s fantastic presentation Learning Cinema 4D Through Experimentation. (If you haven’t seen it, it’s really a must-watch.) In this follow-up presentation, he talks about creating an efficient workflow for production, including some of the tools he uses with Cinema 4D.

Corzine with show you how he approached four different projects, and the techniques he used to get the job done. For his Odwalla campaign, you’ll see him use the MoGraph toolset and Cloner object extensively, then using Signal to fill in the scene.

Read More


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Interview: Behind the Stunning Ad for VELCRO® Brand

June 25, 2018 - By 

See how this surprising piece for VELCRO® Brand had the entire design community enthralled with its beauty and technical wizardry.

Designers Lukas Vojir and Alexa Sirbu recently released their latest collaboration, a stunning piece created on hook and loop technology.

The video was quickly shared among design circles, not only for the video’s beautiful renders, but also its technical achievements. How did they get that shot? It was a question I kept asking myself, so I reached out to Lukas and Alexa to learn more.

Here’s what I learned in our conversation.  Read More


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The Best New Features in the Redshift Renderer Update

June 6, 2018 - By 

Discover the new lighting and animation features that make us excited about the latest version of Redshift.

Redshift has just released version 2.6.10, which you can download on their site. Rob Slater dropped a bunch of great news over in the Redshift forums, and Panos Zompolas followed up with more.

Here are the biggest new features we are excited about.

1. Specular Light Ray Bending through Refraction

Auto reflection in 2.6.10 via Rob Slater / Redshift.

Read More


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Interview: A Skater Turned Designer for Nike, Vans, Marvel and More

June 5, 2018 - By 
Interview: A Skater Turned Designer for Nike, Vans, Marvel and More - Featured

How two surgeries sidelined this skateboarder and turned him into a top motion designer with his own creative powerhouse. This is the story of Already Been Chewed and Barton Damer.

Image via Barton Damer.

All great artists evolve. It comes with the territory. In this industry in particular, motion designers will constantly face pressure, second-guess their abilities, and continue to push themselves harder. That’s what it takes to make it in this industry, or really how to succeed in any type of creative position.

In this interview, you’ll certainly hear about many familiar stages of creative growth. Discovering your talent, honing your skills, facing your fears, getting lucky, taking risks, failing, and evolving. These struggles are not unique to Barton Damer, but his personal experiences are.

Barton Damer is the Founder and Creative Director of Already Been Chewed, or as many may know it as ABC. In our chance encounter, Barton and I learned that we live and work in the same area, a coincidence you’ll find repeating itself in this story. It’s funny how the internet has brought everyone together, but we tend to forget that many of us are just down the road from each other as well. That’s what led to me visiting Barton and his team at Already Been Chewed.

Here’s a glimpse at some of ABC’s most recent work.

I wanted to find out much more about ABC and Barton, and they were gracious enough to host me. Not only did I learn about his personal experiences, but we talked about motion design, rendering, tech, and growing your own business online. Here’s what I learned. Read More


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PureRef is a Must-Use Reference Image Tool for All Creatives

April 24, 2018 - By 
PureRef is a Must-Use Reference Image Tool for All Creatives - Featured Image

Keep your reference images and project notes in your sight at all times with PureRef. No more tabbing between windows and programs.

Once in a while, a productivity tool comes along and changes the way I work. Now to be clear, I think of a good coffee cup as a productivity tool, so that should give a bit of insight into my obsession with honing in my toolset. When a tool can drastically improve your work or your life, I feel compelled to tell people about it. So this is me yelling from the rooftop about my latest obsession, PureRef.

PureRef is a straightforward utility app for Windows, Mac, and Linux with a very simple premise. Keep your reference images in view at all times. The app places your references in a window that stay on top of all your active programs and tools. 

All day I bounce back and forth between my DCC (digital content creation) apps to random reference bookmarks or folders on my machine. Sometimes even dragging images into the Cinema 4D picture viewer just to keep them in sight.

With PureRef, you can create a new canvas and drag as many images onto its infinite canvas as you’d like. The best part is that you can tell PureRef to stay on top of all your open applications and windows. While you’re working, you can dial in your look while having all your reference imagery sitting right next to your preview render (IPR).

The ability to save canvases means you can start keeping multiple PureRef projects to suit your current needs. It’s a huge time saver. I also love how you can quickly zoom, resize, and re-arrange your images anytime you’d like, saving the changes for the next time you need instant inspiration.

This tool improved the look of my work on first use. I was able to take 20 minutes assembling reference imagery, and during my look-dev process, I was able to hit the look I was after in minutes. You can even add notes to yourself within the PureRef canvas. 

Having reference imagery sitting an inch away from your IPR is something I will no longer be able to live without. You will see a lot of it in the future in my tutorials. So do yourself a favor, find an excellent sturdy coffee cup and go download PureRef right now.

About PureRef and Download

PureRef allows you to drag-and-drop files from your machine, or directly from browsers. You can also edit photos in your canvas to meet your needs, including rotation, scale, crop, opacity, and more. You can also customize the canvas and keyboard shortcuts to speed things up.

  • Compatibility
    • Windows 7+
    • Mac OS X 10.9+
    • Linux Ubuntu 14.04+
  • Supported Image Formats
    • BMP, DDS, GIF, ICNS, ICO, JPEG, JP2, MNG, PBM, PGM, PNG, PNM, PPM, PSD, TIFF, WEBP, XBM, XPM, TGA(TrueVision 2.0)

PureRef is a name your own price download, and you can get it here. It’s well worth throwing them a few dollars if you can.


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Guest Daily Render Artist: Rick Lundskow

February 2, 2017 - By 

 

Rick Lundskow aka @lundskow

We’d like to welcome Daily Render Guest Artist Rick Lundskow @lundskow to our ongoing series of awesomeness.

Follow the GSG Daily Render Series on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr


What is your name, position, and where do you currently work?

Rick Lundskow

Art Director

Cornerstone Church

 

How did you get into Cinema 4D?

I’m almost positive I saw a motion graphics video on vimeo back in 2010/2011. It was so impactful that I wanted to learn how to create art like it. I immediately downloaded the trial version and started watching Greyscalegorilla tutorials. After the trial expired I used the demo version. The demo wouldn’t let you save or render out projects, which was a slight bummer because some of the pieces were sweet. However, I could recreate them if I really wanted them.

Once I moved to Michigan to work at Cornerstone, I budgeted for Cinema 4d Studio. That’s when the real fun began.

 

When did you start your daily render practice?

I tried to start daily renders but they took too much time or I ran out of ideas too quickly. I got in my head too much… Each piece had to be amazing, but often times they were not great by any stretch of the imagination.

At Half Rez this past year I had a chance to talk to Beeple, the master of daily renders. He really encouraged me that it wasn’t as big of a deal as I was making it out to be. I just needed to make something happen. I don’t know what it was, but it clicked in my brain and I started the next day, September 15th.

What is the hardest part about doing a daily render?

Time would probably be the most difficult part of a daily render for me. Some nights I don’t get home until 10pm-12am and I haven’t even started on my project. The worst is when I get home late and I don’t even have a concept. On those nights, I wanted to give up. And there were many of those nights. However I’m sure other people have had that same exact excuse but have continued anyway. So I told myself that I couldn’t have any excuses for missing a day.

 

What have you learned by making something every day?

Probably the most significant thing I’ve learned is lighting and reflections. Lighting can make or break your render, so I experimented with different techniques until I found something that works for me. Since I don’t have a fancy render (which might change very soon), I wanted to learn the most with the tools that I had on hand.

As far a basic life skills go, I learned that I can put too much pressure on the creativity. I want the design to be better than the day before it, or create a compelling piece that will sell to millions of people. The former is stressful and the latter hasn’t happened yet. Daily renders are more like experiments. No pressure on the outcome. You try an idea that doesn’t work, but you fix those mistakes the next day and publish your findings. It’s important for me to realize that when I fail, I just found another way of not doing something.

What Hardware and Software do you use to make your work?

I do most of my work on a 2012 MacBook Pro. Nothing too fancy about it but it gets the job done. If I stay late at work, or have some free time over lunch, I’ll create piece on my Mac Pro with 12GB of ram. Then render it out using Team Render across 3-4 of the other machines in the office.

Aside from using Cinema, I use Illustrator a lot to create splines. The shape builder inside Illustrator is incredibly powerful for making custom shapes for lathes, sweeps, and extrudes. I recently purchased ZBrush core. While Cinema’s sculpting tools are great, there were a few features about ZBrush that made it easier to sculpt heads.

 

What is your day to day like at work?

My work schedule changes on a daily basis. I tend to have a theme to each week day though. Mondays are meeting days. A nice easy transition into the work week. Tuesdays are typically my big project day. I can get the most done without a ton of distractions. Wednesdays are a big filming day. We do video announcements in our Sunday services and we record & edit them mid-week. Thursdays are the busiest days because we’re trying to finish the work week strong. So I’ll finish projects that I didn’t quite complete the other work days. Coffee is a requirement for Thursdays. The great thing about my job is that I don’t work Fridays. Actually, I don’t think I’ve had a job in the past 10 years that required me to work Fridays. It’s pretty amazing.

Anything advice to anyone out there just getting started?

Great art isn’t about having the best resources, it’s about using what you have. There’s something special about taking what little resources you do have to create something beautiful. It gives you an appreciation for the things around you. When you hit a roadblock, figure a way around it. Don’t let circumstances hold you back from accomplishing what you want to do.

Also, don’t make it more complicated than it needs to be. Start with a 5 minute idea and work from there. Most of my projects come from a small element I see in my day to day world. Find something that inspires you and run with that idea.

 

Where can people learn more about you?

I’m currently rebuilding my website from scratch, so currently I don’t have more info available.