Posted In:Inspiration | Greyscalegorilla

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Top 10 Most Popular Training Videos Inside of Greyscalegorilla Plus

March 31, 2020 - By 

What do Greyscalegorilla Plus members love to watch and learn? Here are 10 of the most popular lessons.

Who better to share feedback on training than those who have already completed several pro training series in Greyscalegorilla Plus? We reached out to Plus members to tell us about some of the most popular lessons you should be streaming now.

Here are 10 of the most popular lessons that will help add valuable 3D tools and tricks to your workflow.

Not a Greyscalegorilla Plus member? Click here to learn more and join today.


Create Dynamic Procedural MoGraph Animations

Training Series: Procedural Systems in Cinema 4D
Teacher: Zachary Corzine

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Procedural Systems training
3. Scroll Down to “Part 02 – Base System / Approach”
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
By using Fields to drive changes to your base  system, you can dynamically affect Polygon Selections, Shader Changes, Deformers, and much more. This lets you play around and quickly try out different setups without have to rebuild the system or make unnecessary changes.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Drill Holes in Plywood to Make a Pegboard

Training Series: Modern Surface Material Training
Teacher: Chad Ashley

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Download and install Modern Surface Material Collection
3. Click here to watch modern surface material training
4. Scroll Down to “Create a Pegboard in Cinema 4D”
5. Click PLAY to start learning


Pro tip from this lesson
To create the drilled holes, you can use a Cinema 4D Boolean, but you will likely take a speed hit with your render times. A new faster option available for Arnold users is Clip-Geo.

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Make Beautiful Redshift Materials

Training Series: Guide to Redshift
Teacher: Trevor Kerr

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Guide to Redshift
3. Scroll to Training > Redshift Color > “Redshift Materials”
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
If you increase your IOR, your surface will look more metallic. Plastic values tend be be around 1.3, glass around 1.52.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Cinema 4D Fields Masterclass

Training Series: Guide to Cinema 4D (R20)
Teacher: Matthew O’Neill

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Guide to Cinema 4D
3. Open the “Introduction To Fields” chapter
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
Instead of using the traditional target to have objects follow, you can now use other objects as a target. For instance, you can use a spline as the target object

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Make it Rain with X-Particles

Training Series: Guide to X-Particles
Teacher: Jon Bosley

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Guide to X-Particles
3. Open the Training > “Rain” lesson
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
Rain is one of the easiest ways to introduce you to X-particles concepts. You’ll learn that the smaller the particles, the slower they fall from the xpEmitter.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Finally Learn How Houdini Works

Training Series: Introduction to Houdini
Teacher: Russ Gautier

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Introduction to Houdini
3. Scroll to “Part One – Getting Started with Houdini”
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
Houdini is a great complimentary program to Cinema 4D, and solves problems differently. Once you learn how to create and manipulate data, the program is completely and totally open to you.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Are you still not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Push Your Polygon Count Higher Than Ever

Training Series: Guide to Cinema 4D (R20)
Teacher: Nick Campbell

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Guide to Cinema 4D
3. Click the “Multi-Instance Pencil Project”
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
In the past, you were limited to how many times you could clone things, based on polygon count. With Multi-Instance, you can crank the numbers way up! Now instead of always seeing the geometry, you can change the Viewport Mode to a Bouding Box or Points. This allows you to keep working quickly without taking any speed hits while you make changes.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Give New Life to Thinking Particles with Field Force

Training Series: Guide to Cinema 4D (R21)
Teacher: Andy Needham

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Guide to Cinema 4D
3. Click the “GSG Particle Titles” project
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
By combining the Volume Builder and Field Force with a Matrix object, you can generate Thinking Particles natively in Cinema 4D.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Learn to Color Like a Pro

Training Series: Getting to Know ACES (Academy Color Encoding System)
Teacher: Chad Ashley

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Getting to Know ACES
3. Scroll to the “Setting Up ACES” lesson
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
ACES CG is a wide gamut color space that was designed specifically for doing 3D rendering. It is a broader color range, wider gamut than SRGB, meaning you can push your color and light intensity much, much further.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Design Amazing Arnold Shaders

Training Series: Introduction to Arnold
Teacher: Kamel Khezri and Chad Ashley

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Introduction to Arnold – Part One
3. Scroll to Section Four “Arnold Shader Network” lesson
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
The Arnold Shader Network allows you to view, modify, and develop shaders. If you hit Alt+W and then type N, a new shader network will be created immediately.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Not a Plus member? There are hundreds of hours of pro training just like this waiting for you in Greyscalegorilla Plus. This is your all-access pass to becoming a better 3D artist.

Join Greyscalegorilla Plus today and get over $3000 in training and material downloads for only $39 per month.


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Mixing C4D, Charcoal, and Cel Animation for Thom Yorke’s “Last I Heard”

February 4, 2020 - By 

Thom Yorke’s “Last I Heard” Music Video Director Saad Moosajee and Designer Zuheng Yin on using 3D and 2D to capture the Radiohead frontman’s dreams.

Radiohead’s Thom Yorke released his third solo album, ANIMA, last summer along with a short Netflix film directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. He followed it up late last year with the release of a haunting video for the track “Last I Heard (…He Was Circling the Drain)”.

The dreamy black-and-white video was created at New York City-based experimental studio, Art Camp. It opens on a city in chaos and intermittently follows a spacesuit-wearing character through a dystopian landscape filled with faceless crowds, enormous fires and floating cars and debris.

Directed by Art Camp & Saad Moosajee, the video was inspired by Yorke and Radiohead artist Stanley Donwood’s imaginations and contains over 3,000 hand-illustrated and textured frames made using a combination of Cinema 4D, Houdini, charcoal, dust, paint primer and cel animation.

The approach is similar to the one Moosajee and Art Camp took when creating the video for Mitski’s, “A Pearl”. Only this time, an array of artists combined additional techniques and tools, including volumetric lighting, crowd simulation, powder texturing, charcoal washing and VDB. Yorke released the video with an immersive installation during a three-day event in Los Angeles hosted by ANIMA Technologies in October.

“In some ways, the direction for this was looser than what we got for “A Pearl”, Moosajee explains. “Thom told us about some images from his dreams and about how this would relate to the world of ANIMA, which is quite dark, and “Last I Heard” was written with London in mind.” So the brief was focused on creating a video with the look of an old black-and-white film that captured the feeling of anxiety and loneliness that often goes with big cities, like London or New York.

An Ever-Changing Process

Using some of Donwood’s Radiohead artwork, black-and-white photography and old NASA photos for reference, the team expanded on Yorke’s vision, giving each person an opportunity to contribute creatively across different mediums. Though they had only about two and a half months from start to finish, the team felt it was important to experiment and see what worked, so they switched up the process and remade the video over and over again before feeling like they got it right.

3D designer and animator Zuheng Yin worked closely with Moosajee to define the look of the video. “For a music video like this, we felt it was important to attract people from the beginning,” he explains, “Monochrome, film grain, and texture that felt human worked quite well in the context of showing Thom’s world. The visual language became more and more unique by layering our craft.”

To ensure a sense of realism and the look of an old film, the team opted to anchor much of their process in 3D. But, to make things “less perfect,” they used volumetrics and VDB in Cinema 4D, Octane and Houdini to create a layered atmosphere and light the world on fire. “I would often place lights behind animating pyro and fog containers so you would get natural flicker, diffusion and a sort of time-lapse sun effect,” Moosajee recalls. For a grainier look, the team made sure renders were never fully clean and contained noise in the images and volumes, while not being so grainy that they messed up the animation.

Though it looks like a film, nothing was practically shot for the video. Instead, the team designed and modeled the characters in C4D themselves, using motion capture to make characters’ movements look natural. Houdini based crowd simulations were populated with characters modeled in 3D by the team and outfitted using Marvelous Designer, so they would all be visually unique.

To build up the world further, the crowds were placed into custom-designed sets that were often interspersed with traffic simulations.

“Traffic is a big part of every city, and I imagined that the traffic structures inside of the ANIMA universe would follow real-world behavior, but would be just a little off,” Zuheng says. After creating a simulation with real-world behavior inside of Cinema 4D, he distorted it by pulling the road off the ground, deleting the traffic guides and silhouetting the moving cars to accentuate the negative space between vehicles and the city behind them.

Combining Mediums for Maximum Effect

To get the look they wanted for “Last I Heard (…He Was Circling the Drain)”, the team opted for a highly textural approach, using charcoal, paints, ink and powders. “We would print out 3D renders, sprinkle crushed powder over them, and brush on a mix of charcoal and water,” Moosajee explains. In certain scenes, for extra grittiness and texture, they first brushed on oil paint primer before using the charcoal wash. The effect added to the painted feel of the video, with the goal being to give every scene its own unique style based on what was happening in the shot.

From a directing and animating standpoint, Moosajee found the team’s constant reinvention of the pipeline an interesting challenge that worked because everyone was very dedicated and flexible. “One week we’d go, ‘Okay the video is going to be stylized 3D with detailed 2D’. Then the next week we’d say, ‘no the video’s going to be 3D and should feel like film photography with accents of 2D.’”

What they eventually settled on was developing specific media combinations and software pipelines on a shot-by-shot basis, so the balance was always changing in the video. “Our animators and designers enjoyed the back and forth because we were all exploring different ways to build the world together,” Moosajee recalls. “I really think you need to give your team agency to contribute to the style whenever you can because that’s when people do their best work.

Credits:
Made At Art Camp
Directed by Art Camp and Saad Moosajee
Technical Director: James Bartolozzi
Design by Saad Moosajee and Zuheng Yin
Art Direction by Jenny Mascia
3D Animation by Saad Moosajee, Zuheng Yin, Chanyu Chen
Simulation and Effects by James Bartolozzi
Supporting Design: Chanyu Chen, Andrew Finley
Cel Animation by Jenny Mascia, Britton Korbel, Mac Ross, Jeremy Higgins, Danae Gosset

Production Manager: Matthew Kagen
Production Coordinator: John James Russo
Stop Motion Photographer: Jared Pershad
Storyboards by Mac Ross, Jenny Mascia
Cel Animation Consultant: Danae Gosset


Meleah Maynard is a writer and editor in Minneapolis, Minnesota.


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Lighting iPhones and Peripheral Products in Cinema 4D and Octane

October 30, 2019 - By 

Breakdown the composition, lighting, and render settings of this iPhone product render from R4D Studio.

All images via Nik V. of R4D Studio.

After seeing the jaw-dropping renders from R4D Studio on Twitter, we reached out to creator Nik V. to talk about his product render process.

He tells us all about his work creating product renders, then guides us through his latest render of an iPhone 11. Take a look at his process and breakdown this Cinema 4D and Octane project.

Read More


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Exclusive New Pro Training and Last Chance Savings | Greyscalegorilla Plus

October 18, 2019 - By 

Here is your Fall 2019 Greyscalegorilla Plus update, featuring all the new training and downloads that members can access now and in the coming months.

When Greyscalegorilla Plus was first conceived, the goal was to bring you all of Greyscalegorilla’s industry-leading professional training series in one place at one low price. Starting with the Guides to Cinema 4D, Redshift, X-Particles, and other pro training series, Greyscalegorilla Plus quickly became a platform where we could give members so much more.

Today, not only can you stream the training guides and exclusive new training series, members also get access to our popular drag-and-drop material collections. All of our material collections will be in Greyscalegorilla Plus before the end of the year, and even more assets and downloads are on the way.

Render via Zachary Corzine’s Procedural Systems.

Greyscalegorilla Plus is growing at a rapid pace, and things are not slowing down anytime soon. The team just introduced new Head of Plus, Todd Blankenship, who will oversee the release of new training series, downloads, and more.

He has already put together a new quick overview of Greyscalegorilla Plus so he can introduce himself and show you what’s already inside.

Take of tour of Greyscalegorilla Plus by clicking here to checkout the lesson previews

Join before October 31st, and you will get over $1500 in pro training and product downloads for only $348. That’s just $29 a month. The price goes up on November 1st, so don’t miss out. Head over to the Greyscalegorilla Plus page to join, and use discount code NEW2PLUS at checkout to save $120.

Curious to know what is coming to Greyscalegorilla Plus? Let’s dive into a few of the Fall 2019 releases Read More


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Listen to This: Best Creative Podcasts for Motion Designers and 3D Artists

April 2, 2019 - By 
Listen to This: Best Creative Podcasts for Motion Designers and 3D Artists - Featured

These are the podcasts that motion designers, 3D artists, and creatives should be listening to.

Listen to and subscribe to the great podcasts that will help you find inspiration, get advice, learn tips and tricks, and so much more.

The Collective Podcast

The Collective Podcast with Ash Thorp is a bi-weekly series that dives into all things creative. Now with over 200 episodes, the podcast features interviews with many of the best designers, illustrators, VFX artists, writers, painters, and programmers. They talk about the struggles of work/live balance, past projects, and their own experiences in the professional creative industry.

Listen to the Collective Podcast: thecollectivepodcast.com


School of Motion Podcast

The School of Motion podcast is hosted by founder Joey Korenman. On this show, you’ll hear about all things related to motion graphics. Joey interviews tons of amazing artists, School of Motion alumni, and industry professionals. Read More


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A Bountiful Harvest Rendered in Cinema 4D and Octane

December 4, 2018 - By 

What appears to be a traditional Renaissance painting is actually a carefully crafted Cinema 4D render. Here’s how it was made.

All images courtesy of Aaron Covrett.

There are countless photo-realistic renders that make you second guess whether an image is a photograph or 3D render. In the case of Aaron Covrett’s Harvest, you would believe you were studying a painting, but your eyes have deceived you.

What you see is a fine crafted piece of art created by 3D artist Aaron Covrett. I wanted to learn more about his process, and this is what I found out. Read More


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Animating 6 PayPal Commercials Using Cinema 4D and Redshift

October 22, 2018 - By 
Animating 6 PayPal Commercials Using Cinema 4D and Redshift - Featured

See how Run, Kick, Shout and Calabash Animation used Cinema 4D and Redshift to create a series of animated spots for PayPal.

Did you know that over 19 million sites use PayPal? That’s the fun fact I learned in these new animated spots from Run, Kick, Shout. Then I realized that this campaign was 100% effective on me. I learned facts about the client, I enjoyed the animation, and now here I am sharing my thoughts. I consider that a well executed campaign.

Take a look at the PayPal videos here to see what I fell in love with.

I wanted to learn more about this project, and the team behind, so I reached out to Chicago’s Run, Kick, Shout for more. Read More


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The Freelancer’s Guide to Surviving and Thriving When Working At Home

June 27, 2018 - By 
The Freelancer's Guide to Surviving and Thriving When Working At Home - Featured

Transitioning into a freelance or remote work-from-home position? This is a guide to surviving and thriving in a home office.

Multiple times in my career, I’ve worked from home. After many mistakes over the years, I finally figured out how to get work done and still live a normal life. I put together this list of to-do’s and not to-do’s based on my experience, while debunking many of the other work from home articles I’ve read.

Image via Domenico Loia.

As someone having worked in the creative industry for over a decade, I’ve worked in every type of environment. I have worked on set, lived the cubicle life (driving a beige sedan, ugh), worked in an open-plan office, inside a theater tech booth, and now I am in my element, working remotely from home.

If you have the fortune to transfer into a full-time freelance career or remote position, there are upsides and downsides. I’m going to offer some advice and tips I’ve learned on working from home. Read More


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Cineversity Tutorial: 3D Design for Non-Technical Artists

June 11, 2018 - By 
Cineversity Tutorial: 3D Design for Non-Technical Artists - Featured

A 2D artist’s guide to 3D design and using Cinema 4D for commercial projects.

In this Cineversity presentation with Nate Rodriguez-Vera, you’ll see easy ways to get started with 3D design. You’ll hear about his personal journey from music to design, all leading to his commercial 3D work.

He offers advice for artists transitioning into 3D work and then dives into some of his commercial projects. Rodriguez-Vera shows you how to arrange simple shapes with Booleans to make geometric designs, and also breakdowns a Trident spot.

GIF via Nate Rodriguez-Vera / Cineversity.

Read More


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Interview: A Skater Turned Designer for Nike, Vans, Marvel and More

June 5, 2018 - By 
Interview: A Skater Turned Designer for Nike, Vans, Marvel and More - Featured

How two surgeries sidelined this skateboarder and turned him into a top motion designer with his own creative powerhouse. This is the story of Already Been Chewed and Barton Damer.

Image via Barton Damer.

All great artists evolve. It comes with the territory. In this industry in particular, motion designers will constantly face pressure, second-guess their abilities, and continue to push themselves harder. That’s what it takes to make it in this industry, or really how to succeed in any type of creative position.

In this interview, you’ll certainly hear about many familiar stages of creative growth. Discovering your talent, honing your skills, facing your fears, getting lucky, taking risks, failing, and evolving. These struggles are not unique to Barton Damer, but his personal experiences are.

Barton Damer is the Founder and Creative Director of Already Been Chewed, or as many may know it as ABC. In our chance encounter, Barton and I learned that we live and work in the same area, a coincidence you’ll find repeating itself in this story. It’s funny how the internet has brought everyone together, but we tend to forget that many of us are just down the road from each other as well. That’s what led to me visiting Barton and his team at Already Been Chewed.

Here’s a glimpse at some of ABC’s most recent work.

I wanted to find out much more about ABC and Barton, and they were gracious enough to host me. Not only did I learn about his personal experiences, but we talked about motion design, rendering, tech, and growing your own business online. Here’s what I learned. Read More


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Cineversity Tutorial: Simple Tools for Complex 3D Artwork and Animation

May 10, 2018 - By 
Cineversity Tutorial: Simple Tools for Complex 3D Artwork and Animations - Featured

Watch Barton Damer breakdown his fully-animated sneaker commercial using simple tools to create complex projects and 3D animations.

Barton Damer is a motion designer and digital artist who founded the design and motion graphics studio, Already Been Chewed. He and his team have created a variety of design, motion graphics and 3D animated content for some of the most iconic brands in the world including Nike, Vans, Star Wars, Harry Potter, and Marvel.

In this presentation, Barton breaks down the main element of a recently created 30-second animated CG commercial spot for Xtep Footwear. Barton will show you how he models a sidewalk using a single primitive and the MoGraph cloner.

The he’ll uses a deformer and effectors to create an animated wave effect when the shoe hits the ground.

Finally, he’ll use RedShift to add materials and HDR lighting to finish the project.

Check out his NAB presentation below, and thanks to Cineversity for the recording, and to Maxon for hosting these incredible speakers.

Here is a timestamped breakdown courtesy of Cineversity.

00:00 – Introduction
01:25 – Demo Reel
06:01 – Key Visual and Style Boards for Xtep Footwear Commercial Spot
07:29 – Final Xtep Footwear Commercial Spot
08:24 – A Behind the Scenes Edit
12:38 – Using a Primitive to Create the First Piece of the Sidewalk
16:56 – sing MoGraph Cloner to Create the Sidewalk
19:02 – Creating the Concrete Wave in the Sidewalk
30:52 – Adding Materials and Lighting to the Sidewalk


Want more Cinema 4D tips, tricks, and presentations? Check out these Cineversity videos.


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Watch This Stunning Tribute to Akira and See How It Was Created

May 3, 2018 - By 
Watch This Stunning Tribute to Akira and See How It Was Created - Pills Cover Feature

Revisit the world of Akira in this must-see short. Plus breakdown the entire process with hours of behind-the-scenes videos.

Designers Ash Thorp and Zaoeyo (XiaoLin Zeng) teamed up to create an absolutely beautiful tribute to Akira. Watch their short, Akira Awaken.

The tribute was a collaborative project that took over a year to create. For those wanting more, there is so much more content.

The Akira Awaken website not only includes the jaw-dropping renders and comparisons to original stills, but also hours of behind-the-scenes breakdowns.

Image via Ash Thorp / Zaoeyo.

Watch as the team shows you what went into creating each shot from the short. They’ll show you their sketches, as well as Cinema 4D and After Effects project files.

Image via Ash Thorp / Zaoeyo.

The guys tell you all about their challenges creating certain scenes, and having to turn to online tutorials and Wikipedia articles to help them learn.

Image via Ash Thorp / Zaoeyo.

Here’s a look at the first breakdown. There are a total of 26! Watch all of the videos on the Process section of the Akira Awaken site.

There are also some on set photos and a breakdown of the team shooting organic fluids for the project.

Image via Ash Thorp / Zaoeyo.

(If you are interested in playing with and compositing these type of fluid elements, I had the pleasure of making some free fluid elements with the team over at RocketStock. You can go download 19 free 4K fluids in their Nebula pack.)

Project Credits:

Be sure to head over to the Akira Awaken website for all the in-depth videos.

Image via Ash Thorp / Zaoeyo.


Want more?

If you are interested in more like this, check out our interview with Ash Thorp, in which he showed us how he created a cyberpunk western for Nike.

GIF via Ash Thorp / NIKE.