Posted In:Motion Design Archives | Greyscalegorilla

standard

The Fantastic Motion Design Work of Jr.Canest

July 30, 2018 - By 

A look behind the scenes of the stunning work of Jr.canest. Learn how to implement his design techniques in your own workflow.

Jorge Rolando Canedo Estrada, also known as Jr.canest, is a motion designer, animator, and all around creative mind. He is a master in concept, design, and animation.

Image via Jr.canest.

Born in Cochabamba, Bolivia, Jorge now works and resides in Vancouver, Canada. He is passionate about motion design, curating the Vimeo channel WINE after COFFEE, and hosting the Blend conference. ADC named Jorge the Young Guns 12 winner for his animated excellence.

Jorge currently works are a freelance animator and creative director. Take a glimpse of his work in his motion reel.

Jorge Rolando Canedo Estrada has experience working as a motion designer for studios BUCK and Giant Ant, and his previous clients include Google, Facebook, Asana, Twitter, YouTube, WIRED, and Adobe.

Read More


standard

A New Look for NBC’s Longtime Hit Show ‘The Voice’

July 24, 2018 - By 
A New Look for NBC's Longtime Hit Show 'The Voice' - Featured

Family-owned studio, The Other House, explains their work on the brand refresh for the fourteenth season of The Voice.

Working with loved ones is often ill-advised, but that’s not the case with The Other House. Founded in 2011 by brothers Chris and Steve Roth and their wives, Amber and Lara, the Portland, Oregon-based boutique motion/production studio embraces its identity as a family-owned business that also includes a tight-knit group of talented friends.

The Voice’s brand refresh included a vibrant new color scheme and an auditorium-inspired center piece and bleachers. Image via Live Animals / NBC / The Other House.

Among the award-winning studio’s latest projects was a complete brand refresh for season 14 of NBC’s The Voice. Here Chris Roth, The Other House’s Executive Director and Principal Animator, explains the origin of his small yet well-connected studio and talks about how they used Cinema 4D, After Effects and Octane to infuse The Voice’s iconic look with a whole lot of orange-hued energy. Read More


standard

Interview: From Experiments to a 3D Career with Zachary Corzine

July 18, 2018 - By 
Interview: From Experiments to a 3D Career with Zachary Corzine - Featured

We talk to designer turned 3D artist Zachary Corzine about his career path, the tools he uses, and his desire to keep learning.

Zachary Corzine, or as Instagram users may recognize him as @zachdarren, is a designer turned 3D artist living in California. He has worked for a variety of companies and found success as a freelancer for the past few years.

Zach is currently moving to Los Angeles to join the incredibly talented team at ManVsMachine.

Take a glimpse at his work here in his latest reel.

I had the pleasure of meeting Zach earlier this year and learned a ton about his work. It was fascinating to learn about his experimentation and his persistent work ethic to figuring out ways to create things in new ways.

I wanted to learn more about him and his work, and the following is our conversation with some incredible art for you to check out.

Read More


standard

Cineversity Tutorial: Commercial Production Workflows for Freelancers

June 29, 2018 - By 
Cineversity Tutorial: Commercial Production Workflows for Freelancers - Featured

Master your Cinema 4D workflow with these great tips and tools that designer Zachary Corzine uses on his projects for Audi, Odwalla, and Del Taco.

After talking about tips and tricks for freelancers working remotely with the The Freelancer’s Guide to Surviving and Thriving When Working At Home, let’s hop into this great presentation on the commercial production workflow for freelancers from Zach Corzine.

You may recall Corzine’s fantastic presentation Learning Cinema 4D Through Experimentation. (If you haven’t seen it, it’s really a must-watch.) In this follow-up presentation, he talks about creating an efficient workflow for production, including some of the tools he uses with Cinema 4D.

Corzine with show you how he approached four different projects, and the techniques he used to get the job done. For his Odwalla campaign, you’ll see him use the MoGraph toolset and Cloner object extensively, then using Signal to fill in the scene.

Read More


standard

Interview: Behind the Stunning Ad for VELCRO® Brand

June 25, 2018 - By 

See how this surprising piece for VELCRO® Brand had the entire design community enthralled with its beauty and technical wizardry.

Designers Lukas Vojir and Alexa Sirbu recently released their latest collaboration, a stunning piece created on hook and loop technology.

The video was quickly shared among design circles, not only for the video’s beautiful renders, but also its technical achievements. How did they get that shot? It was a question I kept asking myself, so I reached out to Lukas and Alexa to learn more.

Here’s what I learned in our conversation.  Read More


standard

Cineversity Tutorial: Modeling and Animating a Main Title Sequence

June 18, 2018 - By 

Discover the creative process behind Mike Judge’s Tales from the Tour Bus title sequence from storyboard to completion.

Penelope Nederlander is a two-time Emmy-nominated art director and digital artist. She’s been using Cinema 4D for 16 years, and has worked freelance, as a creative director, and now works at Austin-based Rooster Teeth.

In addition to her animation and motion design work, Nederlander has worked in VFX departments for films like Iron Man, The Aviator, and Superman Returns, as well as music videos for Dolly Parton and The Killers. She also worked on the stereoscopic version of the MGM lion logo.

She has frequently collaborated with L.A. studio Shine on several main title sequences for films and shows like Kung Fu Panda, Pitch Perfect, and more. In this presentation, she will go behind her work on the main titles for Mike Judge’s Cinemax show, Tales from the Tour Bus.

Read More


standard

Interview: A Skater Turned Designer for Nike, Vans, Marvel and More

June 5, 2018 - By 
Interview: A Skater Turned Designer for Nike, Vans, Marvel and More - Featured

How two surgeries sidelined this skateboarder and turned him into a top motion designer with his own creative powerhouse. This is the story of Already Been Chewed and Barton Damer.

Image via Barton Damer.

All great artists evolve. It comes with the territory. In this industry in particular, motion designers will constantly face pressure, second-guess their abilities, and continue to push themselves harder. That’s what it takes to make it in this industry, or really how to succeed in any type of creative position.

In this interview, you’ll certainly hear about many familiar stages of creative growth. Discovering your talent, honing your skills, facing your fears, getting lucky, taking risks, failing, and evolving. These struggles are not unique to Barton Damer, but his personal experiences are.

Barton Damer is the Founder and Creative Director of Already Been Chewed, or as many may know it as ABC. In our chance encounter, Barton and I learned that we live and work in the same area, a coincidence you’ll find repeating itself in this story. It’s funny how the internet has brought everyone together, but we tend to forget that many of us are just down the road from each other as well. That’s what led to me visiting Barton and his team at Already Been Chewed.

Here’s a glimpse at some of ABC’s most recent work.

I wanted to find out much more about ABC and Barton, and they were gracious enough to host me. Not only did I learn about his personal experiences, but we talked about motion design, rendering, tech, and growing your own business online. Here’s what I learned. Read More


standard

Cineversity Tutorial: Using Cinema 4D to Create Broadcast TV Promos

May 17, 2018 - By 

Learn techniques and tricks used to create broadcast promo videos for action, comedy, thriller, and sci-fi shows in Cinema 4D.

As the Motion Graphics Design Director for Fox Broadcasting, Dan Pierse creates promos and non-traditional marketing assets in Cinema 4D. In his two presentations, he will demonstrate several techniques he uses while creating different types of promos. Dan first shows you how to create action and comedy promos, and then in part two he will cover sci-fi and thrillers.

To showcase these techniques, he’ll be promoting a fictional channel called Flux. He even went as far as making a creative brief.

Image via Dan Pierse / Cineversity.

Creative Brief:

  • Make tune-in messaging clear
  • Highlight 4 different genres for movie nights
    • Action: Meteor Apocalypse
    • Comedy: Millie Monka and the Donut Factory
    • Sci-Fi: Space Hangar 2
    • Thriller: Moon Lake
  • Build procedurally when you can, there will be changes.

Read More


standard

Cineversity Tutorial: Simple Tools for Complex 3D Artwork and Animation

May 10, 2018 - By 
Cineversity Tutorial: Simple Tools for Complex 3D Artwork and Animations - Featured

Watch Barton Damer breakdown his fully-animated sneaker commercial using simple tools to create complex projects and 3D animations.

Barton Damer is a motion designer and digital artist who founded the design and motion graphics studio, Already Been Chewed. He and his team have created a variety of design, motion graphics and 3D animated content for some of the most iconic brands in the world including Nike, Vans, Star Wars, Harry Potter, and Marvel.

In this presentation, Barton breaks down the main element of a recently created 30-second animated CG commercial spot for Xtep Footwear. Barton will show you how he models a sidewalk using a single primitive and the MoGraph cloner.

The he’ll uses a deformer and effectors to create an animated wave effect when the shoe hits the ground.

Finally, he’ll use RedShift to add materials and HDR lighting to finish the project.

Check out his NAB presentation below, and thanks to Cineversity for the recording, and to Maxon for hosting these incredible speakers.

Here is a timestamped breakdown courtesy of Cineversity.

00:00 – Introduction
01:25 – Demo Reel
06:01 – Key Visual and Style Boards for Xtep Footwear Commercial Spot
07:29 – Final Xtep Footwear Commercial Spot
08:24 – A Behind the Scenes Edit
12:38 – Using a Primitive to Create the First Piece of the Sidewalk
16:56 – sing MoGraph Cloner to Create the Sidewalk
19:02 – Creating the Concrete Wave in the Sidewalk
30:52 – Adding Materials and Lighting to the Sidewalk


Want more Cinema 4D tips, tricks, and presentations? Check out these Cineversity videos.


standard

Our Favorite Episodes of the Greyscalegorilla Podcast

April 27, 2018 - By 

We celebrate our 100th episode milestone by sharing a dozen of our favorite Greyscalegorilla podcasts.

To celebrate 100 episodes of the Greyscalegorilla podcast, we put together a list of some of our favorite episodes. In order of release, dive into these staff favorites.

Is this the end of the Mac?

Way back in one of our earliest episodes, we talked about Apple’s failure to meed the demands of creatives, especially 3D artists and C4D users.

Podcast: Is this the end of the Macintosh for C4D artists?
Episode: 009
Date: November 07, 2016
Listen to, or watch this episode.


Are You Too Old To Do 3D?

We are all getting older, but are we getting too old for this fast-paced and continuously evolving industry?

Podcast: Can you outgrow the motion design industry?
Episode: 046
Date: January 18, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


Make Mornings Suck Less

This classic episode covers our morning routines and the odd habits we’ve picked up that help us get our day started. Like most other episodes, we also talk render wars.

Podcast: Make Mornings Suck Less
Episode: 051
Date: February 20, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


Tips For Working Remotely

In this episode, we share all the good, bad, and lonely parts about working from home. From self discipline to tools, we cover tips and tricks on making working from home easier.

Podcast: Tips for working remotely
Episode: 057
Date: April 03, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


Our take on Apple’s WWDC 2017

Between this and the previous Mac episode, you may see our growing frustrations over the years. Here’s what we though about the newest (at the time) Apple products.

Podcast: Our take on WWDC 2017
Episode: 065
Date: June 06, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


What would you tell your past self?

In this podcast episode, we all share the things we wish we would have known sooner. Whether it’s learning new skills or breaking down your decisions, this is all about questioning your path.

Podcast: What would you tell your past self?
Episode: 078
Date: September 26, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


Learning how to learn

Back-to-back favorite episodes? You better believe it. Following up to self-advice to our younger selves, we then dive into the unique ways we as creatives learn, or even learn how to learn.

Podcast: Learning how to learn
Episode: 079
Date: October 04, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


Wrangling client expectations

Whether your dealing with clients face to face or through a studio CD or Producer, this can be a tricky minefield to navigate. The guys share strategies around wrangling client expectations, using plenty of their trademark metaphors.

Podcast: Wrangling client expectations
Episode: 081
Date: October 17, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


Our favorite things we’ve learned in mograph

We answer a bunch of questions including our favorite things we’ve learned in mograph. We touch on just about everything on this one, including 3D tools, production strategies, and inspirational posters.

Podcast: Our favorite things we’ve learned in mograph
Episode: 083
Date: October 31, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


PROJECT BREAKDOWN

This is a special episode that breaks away from our standard format, Chad and Chris breakdown the animated trailer they created for The Happy Toolbox. You’ll want to watch this episode, so you can see our workspace and renders.

Podcast: The Happy Toolbox project breakdown
Episode: 084
Date: November 14, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


Good Money. Good Work. Good Life Balance. Pick Two.

How do you strike a balance between work and life, and how do you keep the important stuff from falling away? The group talks about freelancing versus going staff, and finding balance and ultimately happiness in this crazy creative business.

Podcast: Good Money. Good Work. Good Life Balance. Pick Two.
Episode: 086
Date: November 27, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


Where did we go wrong?

We managed to make episode 100 an all time favorite. We share stories, many we never have, about our failures. Whether we failed at a job, or made life mistakes, our failures helped lead us to where we are and what we know. Bonus, we have some free downloads to giveaway!

Podcast: Where did we go wrong?
Episode: 100
Date: April 26, 2017
Listen to, or watch this episode.


Did your favorite episode not make the list? Let us know down in the comments which podcasts you loved. If you are looking for more episodes, check out the podcast page for every episode.


standard

Cineversity Tutorial: Speeding Up Your Animation Workflows with C4D

April 25, 2018 - By 
Cineversity Tutorial: Speeding Up Your Animation Workflows with C4D - Cover

In this tutorial from Cineversity, motion designer EJ Hassenfratz shows you how he transitioned from 2D to 3D workflows using Cinema 4D.

Image via EJ Hassenfratz / Cineversity.

Recorded live at Maxon’s 2018 NAB booth, this Cineversity tutorial features motion designer, and Greyscalegorilla regular, EJ Hassenfratz. You’ll hear about him starting his career making 3D logos, and then shifting to work on his animation and color fundamentals.

This is a great presentation for After Effects and 2D creators looking to get started with 3D. You’ll learn about integrating Cinema4D into your 2D workflow, saving time with C4D animation tools, character animation, and some other helpful time saving tips. Dive into Sketch and Toon, learn about Jiggle Deformer, and learn helpful techniques using Voronoi Fracture objects and Dynamics.

Ready? Let’s tune in.

Presentation Breakdown

Here’s a timestamped breakdown courtesy of our friends at Cineversity.

00:00 – Introduction
06:42 – Reel
08:37 – Joystick Project
08:49 – Sketch and Toon Renderer
09:57 – Adjusting Shading Settings
11:22 – Adding Grain
12:26 – Animation Tips
13:07 – Time Remapping with Time Tracks
17:58 – Secondary Animation with the Jiggle Deformer
20:35 – Using the Jiggle Deformer to create Springy Type
23:43 – Better Silhouettes with Falloffs
24:43 – Realtime Liquid Effects
27:50 – Dynamics for Logo Animation
28:17 – Breaking a Logo into Pieces with Voronoi Fracture
28:52 – Adding Dynamics Tags
30:23 – Art-Directing Dynamics with the Trigger Options
31:41 – Invisible Dynamics Triggers with the Ghost Collider Option
33:09 – Other-Worldly Results with Forces
36:47 – Simple Character Animation
39:46 – Squash and Stretch Deformer
41:17 – Reusing Deformer Animation for Different Characters
42:01 – Rigging
42:38 – Adding Joints / Bones
44:26 – Adding Automatic Secondary Animation with IK Dynamics

More from EJ Hassenfratz

GIF via EJ Hassenfratz / Cineversity.


standard

Interview: Ash Thorp on Creating a Cyberpunk Western for Nike

April 9, 2018 - By 
Interview: Ash Thorp on Creating a Cyberpunk Western for Nike - Featured

Designer and Art Director Ash Thorp creates a sci-fi spaghetti western in this Nike VaporMax spot. See how he used GorillaCam to bring the project to life.

Nike’s fourth collaboration with ACRONYM® sees the release of the Nike Air VaporMax Moc 2. To announce the new sneakers, Nike released the following trailer featuring ACRONYM® founder Errolson Hugh and musician John Mayer.

Blink and you might miss the stellar work of designer and all-around creative mind, Ash Thorp. If you aren’t familiar with Thorp’s work, he created many of the stunning posters, concept art, VFX, and titles used in films like Blade Runner 2049, Ghost in the Shell, and several Marvel blockbusters.

You can take a closer look at his Nike work in this video Thorp shared on Twitter.

We wanted to learn more about how this collaboration came about, so we reached out to Ash Thorp. Here’s what we found out in our interview:


Chad Ashley: For those not familiar with your work, could you give us a brief history of who you are, and what you do?

Ash Thorp: My name is Ash Thorp, and I am a creative, I’m a director, artist, illustrator. I’ve been working in the feature film industry and AAA games industry for almost 8 years now.

I primarily work on feature films, that’s my client work. I’m slowly migrating all my efforts to direct my own feature film.

I’m basically a generalist. [laughs]

CA: How long have you been using Cinema 4D?

AT: I’ve been working in Cinema 4D maybe about 7 years now. It’s kinda crazy, seeing I still kinda suck at it. [laughs]

CA: I’m curious about that. You’re work is amazing, and you do a lot of original concept work. How much of that is done in 3D versus sketching.

AT: It all varies and depends. I will sketch my thoughts on paper. If it’s a motion piece, I’ll do a still, or series of stills to sell the idea. From there, it’s full on pipeline mode to do the animation and all that fun stuff.

Image via Nike / Acronym / Ash Thorp.

CA: I just watched your new Nike piece, and it is just fantastic. Can you tell me how that started?

AT: Yeah, it was a quick job. Very quick. Just a couple of weeks. I knew Errolson, who is the founder of ACRONYM clothing. He’s just an awesome guy, and I’ve had him on my podcast.

So, he was pitching a concept and idea to the team at Nike for the release of his new shoe collaboration, the VaporMax. He was like, “You know who could do this? Ash Thorp.”

They needed to make a world very quickly. They pitched the idea to me, to merge a spaghetti western and a cyberpunk world. Instantly I was like, “Wow, that’s really weird. That sounds good. Let’s do it!”

Image via Nike / Acronym / Ash Thorp.

I was thinking, well, we’re really in a place in the realm of CGI that you can do anything you want. That’s really powerful for someone like me, who just wants to get these ideas out of my head as fast as possible.

I saw the vision for what it was, so I grabbed a bunch of assets off of turbosquid, modeled a bunch of stuff, and did some style frames. The Nike guys loved it, Errolson loved it, and then I was like – Ok. To the races.

I was basically rendering for an entire week with all my cards on fire. I think it was a total of three weeks, from nothing to the final.

I wasn’t alone. I had my buddy Toros Kose, and he took care a lot of the heavy lifting in After Effects while I was rendering and building out the worlds. We had a lot of fun passing stuff back and forth.

Image via Nike / Acronym / Ash Thorp.

CA: So it was just the two of you?

AT: Yeah baby!

CA: Dude, that’s great.

AT: I think it’s the future. The future is in smaller teams of smart people working together, complementing strengths and weaknesses and making good stuff. In my mind that’s really where things are going.

I’m seeing the death of the bigger studio. I could be completely wrong, I just feel like that’s the way I’m moving.

Image via Nike / Acronym / Ash Thorp.

CA: I don’t think you’re far off at all. I remember a while back, that you were mentioning you were starting a potential job that would be good for GorillaCam, which we were we still pretty early on in developing. I got you an early version of the plugin to play with. I had no idea you were going to actually use it on a job!

AT: You literally gave me the plugin the day I started animating. That’s how good it is!

CA: Wow, my timing is just that good.  [laughs]

AT: I took it, and watched the tutorial. I think that’s one thing that I will say is so important for software creators and app developers. Please give us an understanding of how this thing works. For people that are crazy busy like myself, and with an attention span of a nit-wit.

I watched the tutorial, and I went right into it. I was like, “Oh, this is what I’ve been wanting for forever now.”

This is the way I did it, which is probably against the way you intended – but I don’t care. I just kept hitting “I’m feeling lucky.” I made two cameras and said I’m feeling lucky, and I was like, yeah, that’s good. Alright, cool. Then I rendered it out.

I wanted it to feel really weird and handheld. Kind of like a drone that was super spazzy. So, I created the cameras in a point A point B, then patched everything together using the GorrilaCam.

I would change the scale to World Scale proper, and then I’d just keep hitting I’m Feeling Lucky. I had no time to really finesse things.

CA: That is exactly how I use it, just so you know. When we were designing it, I said to Chris Schmidt, I want a button that says I’m feeling lucky. I got used to the Google Play Music “I’m Feeling Lucky” button that would build playlists for me. I wanted that functionality in GorillaCam. Sometimes you could surprise yourself, you’re not really sure what you want. So I usually hit that or Randomize Seeds.

Image via Nike / Acronym / Ash Thorp.

AT: Beautiful. Thank you for that. That’s how I work. I’m a weird hyper-child who pixel-fucks everything to death, but I also like randomness. So I enjoy the ability of having flaws. I like to be surprised when I make things.

When you’re at a computer, it’s such a linear experience. It’s very controlled. Oftentimes, it’s about putting imperfections into your work to let it breathe.

I think it works mighty fine for me, and I’m gonna use it like that till the end of time. [laughs]

I’m starting to do pre-viz for my films, and I started slapping the GorillaCam on there, just so it doesn’t feel so rigid. It just helps me do my job faster.

Image via Nike / Acronym / Ash Thorp.

CA: I’ve always wanted this tool in Cinema, and I feel very fortunate to work with developers who can make this a reality. The most satisfaction I get from my job, is hearing from artists like you and hearing that they’re getting something out of it.

AT: I couldn’t be more thankful, honestly. You guys have an interest, you build something, it’s awesome, it’s very useful. It helps me just be an artsy-fartsy guy.

When it comes to CGI work, the thing I love is that it’s the most powerful of the artforms, I think. The thing that I hate about it, it’s the most powerful. It’s so hard to get good at fast. You can’t just go, but you can make a multi-dimensional experience.

Image via Nike / Acronym / Ash Thorp.

CA: What renderer did you guys use for this?

AT: I’m using Octane right now. Testing out Redshift still, but I’m worried about learning a whole new thing.

CA: That’s why I’m here, friend.

AT: [laughs] I know, I know! I’ve seen your new tutorials on Redshift, and it looks so promising and awesome. Especially to someone like me, who uses a lot of volumetric and lights and doesn’t like noise. But, I’ve been using Octane since I started doing GPU stuff.

Image via Nike / Acronym / Ash Thorp.

CA: What about the comp pipeline, that was all After Effects?

AT: Yeah. I just like to render everything without any passes and send if off. I’m kindy risky like that. Then Toros and I will take all the renders, which I have 6 GPUS – 3 Nvidia Titan X‘s and 3 Nvidia GeForce 1080‘s. Some scenes are really heavy geo-wise, so it would be 8 or 9 GB of VRAM. So they’d take like 7-8 minutes a frame.

I think there were 20 shots, each with maybe 40-80 frames, so it was just a lot of rendering. I just didn’t want to do extra passes on top of that. I just didn’t want to deal with that, and I didn’t have the time.

We originally cut it to a Justice track, added glitch and removing things and going bonkers on it up until it shipped. We were working on it up until the last minute.

You know, you hate it when you do it, but the only way to get that stuff out is to put that pressure. It’s unfortunate, but that’s just how it goes.

The people at Nike are very talented, and have great taste. I’m just lucky that they picked me to go along the ride with them, and they realize that they best way to do this stuff is work with a creative and stay out of their way.

They just let me be a bozo and get crazy. Plus I don’t think I’ve ever seen a cyber-western.

CA: That’s great. Thanks for sharing and talking with me.

AT: Thank you for what you’re doing! And thank the entire team at GSG. You’re making it easier to do what I want to do, which I appreciate. Thanks!

Image via Nike / Acronym / Ash Thorp.

Project Credits:

Client – Nike
Creative Director – Danny Demers
Designer/Animator/Art Director – Ash Thorp
Designer/Animator – Toros Kose
Score – Pilotpriest
Producer – Monica Thorp
Producer – Collin Samples
Producer – Bria Hisey
Special Thanks – ZaoeyoGreyscalegorilla

More about this project:

If you want to know more about the product, you can read more about the shoe collaboration on Nike’s website. For more of Ash Thorp’s work, check out his website. His site also includes many of his reels from the films and other projects he’s produced. His Behance page also includes more incredible renders from this project.

You should also check out Ash Thorp’s AWAKEN AKIRA passion project. The short tribute film also has hours of behind-the-scenes breakdowns in C4D and AE.

Image via Ash Throp / Zaoeyo.

If you are curious about the GorillaCam plugin, you can check out the GorillaCam product page here.