Posted In:Motion Design | Greyscalegorilla

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Top 10 Most Popular Training Videos Inside of Greyscalegorilla Plus

March 31, 2020 - By 

What do Greyscalegorilla Plus members love to watch and learn? Here are 10 of the most popular lessons.

Who better to share feedback on training than those who have already completed several pro training series in Greyscalegorilla Plus? We reached out to Plus members to tell us about some of the most popular lessons you should be streaming now.

Here are 10 of the most popular lessons that will help add valuable 3D tools and tricks to your workflow.

Not a Greyscalegorilla Plus member? Click here to learn more and join today.


Create Dynamic Procedural MoGraph Animations

Training Series: Procedural Systems in Cinema 4D
Teacher: Zachary Corzine

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Procedural Systems training
3. Scroll Down to “Part 02 – Base System / Approach”
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
By using Fields to drive changes to your base  system, you can dynamically affect Polygon Selections, Shader Changes, Deformers, and much more. This lets you play around and quickly try out different setups without have to rebuild the system or make unnecessary changes.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Drill Holes in Plywood to Make a Pegboard

Training Series: Modern Surface Material Training
Teacher: Chad Ashley

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Download and install Modern Surface Material Collection
3. Click here to watch modern surface material training
4. Scroll Down to “Create a Pegboard in Cinema 4D”
5. Click PLAY to start learning


Pro tip from this lesson
To create the drilled holes, you can use a Cinema 4D Boolean, but you will likely take a speed hit with your render times. A new faster option available for Arnold users is Clip-Geo.

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Make Beautiful Redshift Materials

Training Series: Guide to Redshift
Teacher: Trevor Kerr

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Guide to Redshift
3. Scroll to Training > Redshift Color > “Redshift Materials”
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
If you increase your IOR, your surface will look more metallic. Plastic values tend be be around 1.3, glass around 1.52.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Cinema 4D Fields Masterclass

Training Series: Guide to Cinema 4D (R20)
Teacher: Matthew O’Neill

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Guide to Cinema 4D
3. Open the “Introduction To Fields” chapter
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
Instead of using the traditional target to have objects follow, you can now use other objects as a target. For instance, you can use a spline as the target object

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Make it Rain with X-Particles

Training Series: Guide to X-Particles
Teacher: Jon Bosley

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Guide to X-Particles
3. Open the Training > “Rain” lesson
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
Rain is one of the easiest ways to introduce you to X-particles concepts. You’ll learn that the smaller the particles, the slower they fall from the xpEmitter.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Finally Learn How Houdini Works

Training Series: Introduction to Houdini
Teacher: Russ Gautier

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Introduction to Houdini
3. Scroll to “Part One – Getting Started with Houdini”
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
Houdini is a great complimentary program to Cinema 4D, and solves problems differently. Once you learn how to create and manipulate data, the program is completely and totally open to you.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Are you still not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Push Your Polygon Count Higher Than Ever

Training Series: Guide to Cinema 4D (R20)
Teacher: Nick Campbell

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Guide to Cinema 4D
3. Click the “Multi-Instance Pencil Project”
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
In the past, you were limited to how many times you could clone things, based on polygon count. With Multi-Instance, you can crank the numbers way up! Now instead of always seeing the geometry, you can change the Viewport Mode to a Bouding Box or Points. This allows you to keep working quickly without taking any speed hits while you make changes.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Give New Life to Thinking Particles with Field Force

Training Series: Guide to Cinema 4D (R21)
Teacher: Andy Needham

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Guide to Cinema 4D
3. Click the “GSG Particle Titles” project
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
By combining the Volume Builder and Field Force with a Matrix object, you can generate Thinking Particles natively in Cinema 4D.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Learn to Color Like a Pro

Training Series: Getting to Know ACES (Academy Color Encoding System)
Teacher: Chad Ashley

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Getting to Know ACES
3. Scroll to the “Setting Up ACES” lesson
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
ACES CG is a wide gamut color space that was designed specifically for doing 3D rendering. It is a broader color range, wider gamut than SRGB, meaning you can push your color and light intensity much, much further.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Design Amazing Arnold Shaders

Training Series: Introduction to Arnold
Teacher: Kamel Khezri and Chad Ashley

Watch This Lesson Now

1. Sign into your Greyscalegorilla Plus account
2. Click here to watch Introduction to Arnold – Part One
3. Scroll to Section Four “Arnold Shader Network” lesson
4. Click PLAY to start learning

Pro tip from this lesson
The Arnold Shader Network allows you to view, modify, and develop shaders. If you hit Alt+W and then type N, a new shader network will be created immediately.

Here’s what one of our members had to say about this training series…

Not a Plus Member? Click here to join.

Not a Plus member? There are hundreds of hours of pro training just like this waiting for you in Greyscalegorilla Plus. This is your all-access pass to becoming a better 3D artist.

Join Greyscalegorilla Plus today and get over $3000 in training and material downloads for only $39 per month.


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Mixing C4D, Charcoal, and Cel Animation for Thom Yorke’s “Last I Heard”

February 4, 2020 - By 

Thom Yorke’s “Last I Heard” Music Video Director Saad Moosajee and Designer Zuheng Yin on using 3D and 2D to capture the Radiohead frontman’s dreams.

Radiohead’s Thom Yorke released his third solo album, ANIMA, last summer along with a short Netflix film directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. He followed it up late last year with the release of a haunting video for the track “Last I Heard (…He Was Circling the Drain)”.

The dreamy black-and-white video was created at New York City-based experimental studio, Art Camp. It opens on a city in chaos and intermittently follows a spacesuit-wearing character through a dystopian landscape filled with faceless crowds, enormous fires and floating cars and debris.

Directed by Art Camp & Saad Moosajee, the video was inspired by Yorke and Radiohead artist Stanley Donwood’s imaginations and contains over 3,000 hand-illustrated and textured frames made using a combination of Cinema 4D, Houdini, charcoal, dust, paint primer and cel animation.

The approach is similar to the one Moosajee and Art Camp took when creating the video for Mitski’s, “A Pearl”. Only this time, an array of artists combined additional techniques and tools, including volumetric lighting, crowd simulation, powder texturing, charcoal washing and VDB. Yorke released the video with an immersive installation during a three-day event in Los Angeles hosted by ANIMA Technologies in October.

“In some ways, the direction for this was looser than what we got for “A Pearl”, Moosajee explains. “Thom told us about some images from his dreams and about how this would relate to the world of ANIMA, which is quite dark, and “Last I Heard” was written with London in mind.” So the brief was focused on creating a video with the look of an old black-and-white film that captured the feeling of anxiety and loneliness that often goes with big cities, like London or New York.

An Ever-Changing Process

Using some of Donwood’s Radiohead artwork, black-and-white photography and old NASA photos for reference, the team expanded on Yorke’s vision, giving each person an opportunity to contribute creatively across different mediums. Though they had only about two and a half months from start to finish, the team felt it was important to experiment and see what worked, so they switched up the process and remade the video over and over again before feeling like they got it right.

3D designer and animator Zuheng Yin worked closely with Moosajee to define the look of the video. “For a music video like this, we felt it was important to attract people from the beginning,” he explains, “Monochrome, film grain, and texture that felt human worked quite well in the context of showing Thom’s world. The visual language became more and more unique by layering our craft.”

To ensure a sense of realism and the look of an old film, the team opted to anchor much of their process in 3D. But, to make things “less perfect,” they used volumetrics and VDB in Cinema 4D, Octane and Houdini to create a layered atmosphere and light the world on fire. “I would often place lights behind animating pyro and fog containers so you would get natural flicker, diffusion and a sort of time-lapse sun effect,” Moosajee recalls. For a grainier look, the team made sure renders were never fully clean and contained noise in the images and volumes, while not being so grainy that they messed up the animation.

Though it looks like a film, nothing was practically shot for the video. Instead, the team designed and modeled the characters in C4D themselves, using motion capture to make characters’ movements look natural. Houdini based crowd simulations were populated with characters modeled in 3D by the team and outfitted using Marvelous Designer, so they would all be visually unique.

To build up the world further, the crowds were placed into custom-designed sets that were often interspersed with traffic simulations.

“Traffic is a big part of every city, and I imagined that the traffic structures inside of the ANIMA universe would follow real-world behavior, but would be just a little off,” Zuheng says. After creating a simulation with real-world behavior inside of Cinema 4D, he distorted it by pulling the road off the ground, deleting the traffic guides and silhouetting the moving cars to accentuate the negative space between vehicles and the city behind them.

Combining Mediums for Maximum Effect

To get the look they wanted for “Last I Heard (…He Was Circling the Drain)”, the team opted for a highly textural approach, using charcoal, paints, ink and powders. “We would print out 3D renders, sprinkle crushed powder over them, and brush on a mix of charcoal and water,” Moosajee explains. In certain scenes, for extra grittiness and texture, they first brushed on oil paint primer before using the charcoal wash. The effect added to the painted feel of the video, with the goal being to give every scene its own unique style based on what was happening in the shot.

From a directing and animating standpoint, Moosajee found the team’s constant reinvention of the pipeline an interesting challenge that worked because everyone was very dedicated and flexible. “One week we’d go, ‘Okay the video is going to be stylized 3D with detailed 2D’. Then the next week we’d say, ‘no the video’s going to be 3D and should feel like film photography with accents of 2D.’”

What they eventually settled on was developing specific media combinations and software pipelines on a shot-by-shot basis, so the balance was always changing in the video. “Our animators and designers enjoyed the back and forth because we were all exploring different ways to build the world together,” Moosajee recalls. “I really think you need to give your team agency to contribute to the style whenever you can because that’s when people do their best work.

Credits:
Made At Art Camp
Directed by Art Camp and Saad Moosajee
Technical Director: James Bartolozzi
Design by Saad Moosajee and Zuheng Yin
Art Direction by Jenny Mascia
3D Animation by Saad Moosajee, Zuheng Yin, Chanyu Chen
Simulation and Effects by James Bartolozzi
Supporting Design: Chanyu Chen, Andrew Finley
Cel Animation by Jenny Mascia, Britton Korbel, Mac Ross, Jeremy Higgins, Danae Gosset

Production Manager: Matthew Kagen
Production Coordinator: John James Russo
Stop Motion Photographer: Jared Pershad
Storyboards by Mac Ross, Jenny Mascia
Cel Animation Consultant: Danae Gosset


Meleah Maynard is a writer and editor in Minneapolis, Minnesota.


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Arnold is the Most Versatile Render Engine for Cinema 4D

December 11, 2019 - By 
Arnold is the Most Versatile Render Engine for Cinema 4D - Featured

With the latest release, Autodesk’s Arnold renderer becomes the most versatile C4D render engine that works on both CPU and GPU.

One of the most asked questions Greyscalegorilla receives is which render engine to use. It’s still not a simple answer, but for the first time, we can definitely recommend one based on versatility + features.

Autodesk Arnold is one of the leading Cinema 4D render engines that can be used by both Mac and PC artists, and now that the NVIDIA GPU version is fully released it’s incredibly powerful.

Arnold 6 is not the most feature-rich new release, but it doesn’t really have to be.

The removal of the word BETA from it’s GPU offering could be called premature (and I wouldn’t necessarily argue with them), but there is no denying the power of being able to flip from CPU to GPU. The new licensing methods are also a welcome change to the old, overly complicated system that required a degree in IT to get up and running (though still has tons of room for improvement).

Let’s dive into the latest release, and really take a look at things.

Overall Benefits to Arnold 6:

  • Easy to Use
  • Most versatile renderer for both Mac and PC (CPU + GPU), though GPU is not supported on Mac
  • Works across all major DCC’s including Cinema, Houdini, Maya, and Max
  • Most feature-rich renderer (including a full Toon System)
  • Supports more native C4D features than most current renderers (Noises, Background Object, Floor Object, etc)
  • Extremely stable
  • Memory Efficient
  • Affordable Single Seat Licenses
  • Monthly subscriptions available
  • No watermark restrictions – You can work on the watermarked version with no feature limitations
  • Extremely responsive IPR in both CPU/GPU
  • Supports industry standards like OCIO+ACES, OSL

5 Must-Know Things About Arnold 6

  1. Arnold GPU:
    • Out of Beta
    • More Stable
    • Supporting nearly every feature of CPU (including light filters, LPE’s, and nearly all AOVs)
    • No Mac Support
  2. Lower Pricing Structure
  3. New Arnold license process – Somewhat easier to get up and running, and cheaper options.
  4. A ton of bug fixes. Stability matters in production.
  5. Quality of life updates (node alignment tools, material exports, etc)

Thoughts on Arnold GPU

Arnold GPU was no small feat. Taking a production-proven CPU renderer and pushing it to deliver 1:1 results on the GPU is very difficult. Renderman is currently working on XPU which promises to harness the power of your CPU and GPU simultaneously, but it’s proved challenging to bring to market. We believe the future is about leveraging ALL your hardware. Power and flexibility will always win out. Arnold being able to give 1:1 results on both CPU and GPU is incredibly compelling.

If I were starting a small studio right now, I would be using Arnold GPU on my artists’ workstations to do look dev/lighting and then switching to CPU mode to throw to an inexpensive cloud render farm solution such as Pixel Plow. I’d outfit every 3D workstation with dual 2080ti’s and a Threadripper to give every artist the flexibility to use whichever mode better suits their work. What a time to be alive!

Now I’ve been on the beta for Arnold GPU since it opened over a year ago. I’ve watched it slowly go from a buggy, noisy mess into something I actually use on a daily basis.

The first question anyone ever asks me is whether or not it’s faster than it’s competitor Redshift. My answer is always the same, mostly no. In my testing, Arnold GPU is 10-20% slower than Redshift on most tasks. However, in some cases, it can close that gap very nicely (usually on scenes with tons of GI bounces).

Even with Redshift besting it in terms of sheer speed (as one would expect from a biased GPU renderer), it cannot touch Arnold in terms of features and user experience. Arnold outshines its competitors with production proven features and a Cinema 4D plugin that is easily best in class.

I’m also a bit spoiled as I use Arnold with a 64-core AMD Threadripper. So Arnold CPU for me is certainly no slouch. In fact, only now with Arnold 6 can I say that their GPU offering is giving my beast of a CPU a run for it’s money.

Should I switch to Arnold GPU?

Well, there are a few things to consider

  • Arnold GPU is Windows only, sorry no Mac support at this time
  • Arnold GPU is Nvidia ONLY and more cards the better. I HIGHLY recommend RTX cards as Arnold GPU is optimized for that platform. I’ve got two 2080ti’s and I wish I had more!
  • Arnold GPU takes advantage of NVLink (an $80 device that links multiple RTX cards together) and in my opinion, is a MUST HAVE if you want to maximize speed in Arnold GPU.
  • You also have to be “OK” with Arnold GPU taking a bit longer to render than it’s competition, but in exchange you get superior features and first-in-class plugin experience. Plus, you can always design in GPU and send to a CPU farm. Versatility!

What are the Key New Features of Arnold 6?

  • Faster creased subdivs: Hard creases are now fully supported in adaptive and multithreaded mode. This means creased surfaces will use all procs during subdivision.
  • Dielectric microfacet multiple scattering: Rough dielectrics are now energy-preserving by accounting for multiple scattering between microfacets for both reflection and refraction, avoiding the energy loss of the previous implementation. Disabling the global option enable_microfacet_multiscatter will restore the previous look.
  • Physical Sky shader improvements: The physical sky shader will now extend the color at the horizon all the way down to the bottom pole.
  • Improved roughness mapping of the Oren-Nayar diffuse BRDF: The Oren-Nayar roughness parameter has been remapped so that values close to 1 no longer result in excessive darkening. This change also improves the Standard Surface and Car Paint shaders.
  • Improved rough thin-wall transmission in Standard Surface shader: Refractions in thin-walled mode now appear blurry with non-zero roughness.
  • OCIO roles: Roles can now be listed with the color manager API by querying color spaces available in the Role (OCIO) family. This makes it possible to build UIs that list all known roles.
  • Skip RGBA denoising: Noise now accepts -ignore_rgba or -irgba to skip denoising of RGBA even if it’s present.
  • OpenImageIO 2.1.4: OIIO support is now upgraded to 2.1.4.
  • More accurate albedo AOVs: Albedo AOVs now correspond more closely to the true albedos of the material’s BSDFs.
  • New AOV Write Vector shader: This enables the writing of vector values into a  typed AOV, for example for recording positional values. These would previously have been clamped when using  typed AOVs

C4DtoA Plugin Enhancements

  • Material export/import: Materials can be exported to ASS files and MaterialX files (.mtlx) via the C4DtoA > Utilities > Material > Export to ASS… menu item or via the Alt~W+X shortcut in the Material Manager. Materials can be imported via the C4DtoA > Utilities > Material > Import from ASS… menu item or Alt~W+I shortcut. Selected shaders from a material can also be exported from the network editor.
  • Align nodes in the network editor: New Edit > Align nodes menu item and Alt~W+L shortcut is added to the network editor to align graph nodes in the layout.
  • Notification when no license found or license will expire: Now a message is displayed in the render settings when no Arnold license found or two weeks before the license expires.
  • New Licensing menu: Licensing menu moved to C4DtoA > Licensing with menu items to open the new Arnold License Manager, help and purchase pages. Note that single-user licensing is not available for testing.
  • Added aov_write_vector shader
  • Add Details and Project tabs to Arnold Sky: ****Light filters, user options and light linking settings are moved to these new tabs to be consistent with other lights.
  • Flush Caches menu moved under Utilities

Want to learn more?

Check out the C4DtoA 3.0.1 documentation and Arnold 6 overview.


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A Must Watch: Promoting Wolkov’s New Watches with a Colorful Spot

November 11, 2019 - By 

Paul Clements on how he used Cinema 4D, After Effects and Arnold to create a style-conscious watch promo.

Like many directors, Paul Clements runs his own business, London-based RocknRoller Studios. While he often handles projects on his own, he frequently builds teams of freelance artists and designers from all over the world, allowing him to keep work moving forward nearly 24 hours a day.

Known for his motion design and directorial work for Adidas, Cadillac, Sky and other brands, Clements was recently asked to design and animate a promo piece for Wolkov, a new watch company looking for a distinctive way to showcase their product’s fresh, youthful features.

Because they had already seen and liked some of his previous work, Wolkov trusted Clements with a very open brief. And he spent two intense weeks using Cinema 4D, After Effects, and Arnold to create a launch promo that dynamically highlights the watch’s versatility.

Here Clements explains his process explains his process, including why he chooses to work in an iterative way that can sometimes means redoing shots 20 or 30 times. Read More


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Exclusive New Pro Training and Last Chance Savings | Greyscalegorilla Plus

October 18, 2019 - By 

Here is your Fall 2019 Greyscalegorilla Plus update, featuring all the new training and downloads that members can access now and in the coming months.

When Greyscalegorilla Plus was first conceived, the goal was to bring you all of Greyscalegorilla’s industry-leading professional training series in one place at one low price. Starting with the Guides to Cinema 4D, Redshift, X-Particles, and other pro training series, Greyscalegorilla Plus quickly became a platform where we could give members so much more.

Today, not only can you stream the training guides and exclusive new training series, members also get access to our popular drag-and-drop material collections. All of our material collections will be in Greyscalegorilla Plus before the end of the year, and even more assets and downloads are on the way.

Render via Zachary Corzine’s Procedural Systems.

Greyscalegorilla Plus is growing at a rapid pace, and things are not slowing down anytime soon. The team just introduced new Head of Plus, Todd Blankenship, who will oversee the release of new training series, downloads, and more.

He has already put together a new quick overview of Greyscalegorilla Plus so he can introduce himself and show you what’s already inside.

Take of tour of Greyscalegorilla Plus by clicking here to checkout the lesson previews

Join before October 31st, and you will get over $1500 in pro training and product downloads for only $348. That’s just $29 a month. The price goes up on November 1st, so don’t miss out. Head over to the Greyscalegorilla Plus page to join, and use discount code NEW2PLUS at checkout to save $120.

Curious to know what is coming to Greyscalegorilla Plus? Let’s dive into a few of the Fall 2019 releases Read More


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Making The Lonely Island’s Unauthorized Bash Brothers Experience

October 1, 2019 - By 

How production studio Lord Danger helped The Lonely Island realize their crazy Netflix visual poem tribute to ‘80s baseball.

Comedy Trio, The Lonely Island—Akiva Schaffer, Andy Samberg and Jorma Taccone—met in junior high and have been collaborating on creative projects for years. After a longtime stint with Saturday Night Live, the troupe has lately become known for producing their own viral videos and studio albums.

Among their recent releases is a Netflix comedy special called The Unauthorized Bash Brothers Experience. Billed as a “visual poem,” the half-hour mockumentary features Samberg and Schaffer as 1980’s baseball legends Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire (a.k.a. the Bash Brothers). The storyline imagines what their rap album and accompanying videos might have been like if they had really captured their experiences chasing the ladies, taking steroids, working out, being rich, and occasionally pondering questions of love and the meaning of life and fame.

For “IHOP Parking Lot” freelance artist Josh Johnson used a modified TurboSquid model, the Everyday Material Collection, C4D and Octane to create a Back to the Future-like car scene.

Mike Diva (Dahlquist), of the LA-based production company, Lord Danger, teamed up with Lonely Island’s Akiva Schaffer to co-direct the special. Diva also assembled and led Lord Danger’s team of global freelancers who worked on the show from concepting to completion over four months using a combination of Cinema 4D, After Effects, Blender, and Nuke. Read More


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The 3D Design + Motion Tour is Coming to a City Near You (Get 25% Off)

August 27, 2019 - By 

Join fellow 3D artists and motion designers around the world at the 3D Design + Motion Tour. Save 25% on your ticket price with this special offer code.

Maxon has teamed up with AdobeNvidiaDell, Perception, Greyscalegorilla, and Pixel Plow to bring you an epic tour unlike any other motion design event. 26 major cities with dozens of speakers, special guests, and software for you to take home.

3D Design + Motion Tour

The 3D Design + Motion Tour runs September 4 – December 10, 2019 in 26 different cities around the world.

Attendees can expect to see presenters and guest panels featuring motion design and VFX artists like Andrew Kramer, Nick Campbell, EJ Hassenfratz, Chris Schmidt, and many more! Read More


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What Version of Cinema 4D Should I Buy or Subscribe to?

August 8, 2019 - By 
What Version of Cinema 4D Should I Buy or Subscribe to? - Guide Featured

With several options to choose from, which version of Cinema 4D is right for you? Follow along with this guide to choose the right version or subscription.

In an attempt to simplify the entire purchasing process, Maxon has eliminated the various versions of Cinema 4D (Studio, Prime, Broadcast, etc) and has announced that going forward there will be only one version of C4D.

While choosing the right version of Cinema 4D has now become a lot easier, choosing the right subscription bundle has users scratching their heads.

So let’s dive into the new options to pick which is right for you.

Cinema 4D Purchasing Options

Cinema 4D is available as either a one-time purchase with the perpetual license or as an ongoing subscription. Read More


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Beeple Reveals Everyday Secrets and Shows His Daily C4D Process

July 9, 2019 - By 
Beeple Reveals Everyday Secrets and Shows His Daily C4D Process - Featured

Mike Winkelmann, AKA Beeple, shares insight to his daily creative process and offers tips and tricks for 3D artists of all levels.

For the uninitiated, Beeple is a 3D artist and motion designer who has reached legendary status for his daily creations. He helped grow the “everyday” movement which inspires artists to create new pieces of work everyday so they can continue to grow their skills. To date, Beeple has created over 4400 daily renders.

His work has been featured in places like the Louis Vuitton runway and was recently admired on the Joe Rogan Experience podcast.

Read More


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Our Thoughts on the New Mac Pro for 3D and Motion Design

June 3, 2019 - By 

The new Mac Pro has finally been revealed. Is it powerful enough to get us to switch back to Mac?

All images via Apple.

It’s been 6 years since the last Mac Pro redesign, and the “trash can” mac left much to be desired.  You couldn’t upgrade the machine, it was under-powered, and it was overpriced.

We just learned about all the new laptops NVIDIA has planned for the year, but the big question remaining was if Apple would finally announce a new Mac Pro in 2019.

So where do we stand now? Well, the new Mac Pro returns to classic from and has overly embraced the cheese grater design of old. You are once again able to expand and upgrade the machine, but there is a big downside. Still no NVIDIA support. Let’s dive into the details. Read More


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Assembling Avengers: Endgame User Interfaces and Holograms with C4D

May 16, 2019 - By 
Assembling Avengers: Endgame User Interfaces and Holograms with C4D - Featured

Territory Studio Creative Director Marti Romances on working with Marvel Studios on Avengers: Endgame graphics and futuristic UI.

Territory Studio has worked with Marvel production designer Charles Wood’s team to realize aspects of many Marvel blockbusters, including Guardians of the Galaxy, Captain America: Winter Soldier, Avengers: Age of Ultron and Infinity War. Now with Avengers: Endgame Territory’s San Francisco team once again helped bring directors Anthony and Joe Russo’s vision to life.

Here Territory Creative Director Marti Romances describes the studio’s latest foray into the Marvel Universe, explaining the team’s use of Cinema 4D and other software, as well as what it was like to be embedded with the Marvel team in Atlanta, Georgia. Read More


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Painting Over Cinema 4D Renders to Animate a Spotify Music Video

April 16, 2019 - By 
Painting Over Cinema 4D Renders to Animate a Spotify Music Video - Featured

A behind-the-scenes look at the surreal and powerful Spotify music video for Mitski’s “A Pearl.”

In the new music video for Mitski’s, “A Pearl,” from Be the Cowboy, a barefoot woman walks determinedly for a while before breaking into a run that turns into a freefall as the lyrics lay bare her soul. Eventually, the Mitski-like woman lands on her feet and begins walking again and it’s hard to know whether to breathe a sigh of relief, or cry.

Artful and heart-wrenching, the Spotify-commissioned video is a collaborative creation by Brooklyn-based studio Art Camp and New York City-based designers/animators Saad Moosajee and Danaé Gosset. Read More