Posted On:Cinema 4D Archives | Greyscalegorilla

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Everything You Need to Know About Cinema 4D R20

September 18, 2018 - By 
Everything You Need to Know About Cinema 4D R20 - Featured

MAXON’s Cinema 4D R20 is officially out. Are you already using R20? Here’s what you need to know.

The much-anticipated release 20 of Cinema 4D had users salivating over all the big new features, and now you can start experimenting with Fields, node-based materials, and much more!

Already downloaded R20 and have a few questions? Here’s what you need to know.  Read More


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The Top Ten New Features in Light Kit Pro 3

August 29, 2018 - By 

Want to learn more about the Light Kit Pro 3 plugin for Cinema 4D? Here are our top ten new features in action.

Did you know Light Kit Pro 3 is the biggest plugin ever built by Greyscalegorilla? It’s so much more than just lights! Packed into the over 13,000 lines of code are tons of new features, tools, presets, and more.

Sure, Light Kit Pro 3 introduces some nice new things, like customizable studio presets, a searchable Light Kit Browser, dockable palette icons, and a PC and Mac installer so you can get up and running in no time, but there are ten standout new features that we think you have to know about.  Read More


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Breaking News: Cinema 4D R20 Arrives with Major Updates

August 1, 2018 - By 
Everything You Need to Know About Cinema 4D R20 - Featured

MAXON announces Release 20 of Cinema 4D featuring new tools and updates like MoGraph Fields, Node-Based Materials, Volume Modeling and more.

Image via MAXON Computer GmbH / Marc Zinnecker.

The latest release of Cinema 4D is here, and there are some big changes. We’re diving into what’s new, so keep an eye out for some upcoming tutorials and tune into AskGSG at 2 PM CST today to see Chris tackle R20.

Cinema 4D R20 will debut live at Siggraph 2018. Join Greyscalegorilla at the MAXON Cinema 4D booth to learn from Nick, Chris, and Chad. If you can’t attend in person, you and tune into a live stream at c4dlive.com during the show, August 14-16.

In the meantime, here’s what we know about the latest C4D. Read More


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A New Look for NBC’s Longtime Hit Show ‘The Voice’

July 24, 2018 - By 
A New Look for NBC's Longtime Hit Show 'The Voice' - Featured

Family-owned studio, The Other House, explains their work on the brand refresh for the fourteenth season of The Voice.

Working with loved ones is often ill-advised, but that’s not the case with The Other House. Founded in 2011 by brothers Chris and Steve Roth and their wives, Amber and Lara, the Portland, Oregon-based boutique motion/production studio embraces its identity as a family-owned business that also includes a tight-knit group of talented friends.

The Voice’s brand refresh included a vibrant new color scheme and an auditorium-inspired center piece and bleachers. Image via Live Animals / NBC / The Other House.

Among the award-winning studio’s latest projects was a complete brand refresh for season 14 of NBC’s The Voice. Here Chris Roth, The Other House’s Executive Director and Principal Animator, explains the origin of his small yet well-connected studio and talks about how they used Cinema 4D, After Effects and Octane to infuse The Voice’s iconic look with a whole lot of orange-hued energy. Read More


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Cineversity Tutorial: Commercial Production Workflows for Freelancers

June 29, 2018 - By 
Cineversity Tutorial: Commercial Production Workflows for Freelancers - Featured

Master your Cinema 4D workflow with these great tips and tools that designer Zachary Corzine uses on his projects for Audi, Odwalla, and Del Taco.

After talking about tips and tricks for freelancers working remotely with the The Freelancer’s Guide to Surviving and Thriving When Working At Home, let’s hop into this great presentation on the commercial production workflow for freelancers from Zach Corzine.

You may recall Corzine’s fantastic presentation Learning Cinema 4D Through Experimentation. (If you haven’t seen it, it’s really a must-watch.) In this follow-up presentation, he talks about creating an efficient workflow for production, including some of the tools he uses with Cinema 4D.

Corzine with show you how he approached four different projects, and the techniques he used to get the job done. For his Odwalla campaign, you’ll see him use the MoGraph toolset and Cloner object extensively, then using Signal to fill in the scene.

Read More


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Cineversity Tutorial: Modeling and Animating a Main Title Sequence

June 18, 2018 - By 

Discover the creative process behind Mike Judge’s Tales from the Tour Bus title sequence from storyboard to completion.

Penelope Nederlander is a two-time Emmy-nominated art director and digital artist. She’s been using Cinema 4D for 16 years, and has worked freelance, as a creative director, and now works at Austin-based Rooster Teeth.

In addition to her animation and motion design work, Nederlander has worked in VFX departments for films like Iron Man, The Aviator, and Superman Returns, as well as music videos for Dolly Parton and The Killers. She also worked on the stereoscopic version of the MGM lion logo.

She has frequently collaborated with L.A. studio Shine on several main title sequences for films and shows like Kung Fu Panda, Pitch Perfect, and more. In this presentation, she will go behind her work on the main titles for Mike Judge’s Cinemax show, Tales from the Tour Bus.

Read More


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Cineversity Tutorial: Making Comedic Graphics and Bumpers for Television

May 29, 2018 - By 

Learn the tricks Motion Designer Sarah Wickliffe uses when she creates graphics for The Onion, Comedy Central, and other networks.

Creating satirical news pieces requires work to be completed incredibly fast. In this Cineversity presentation, Sarah Wickliffe shows you how she quickly creates pieces for The Onion News Network, The Chew on ABC, The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore on Comedy Central, and The Rundown with Robin Thede on BET.

Read More


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Cineversity Tutorial: Using 3D to Enhance the Look of 2D Deliverables

May 11, 2018 - By 

Watch as Andy Needham shows you how he created a series of promotional GIFs starring professional athletes. From import to render, see how he used 3D to create these 2D spots.

At NAB 2018, artist and tutorial author Andy Needham shared how he created a series of GIFs featuring a beverage and pro athletes (who both will remain nameless).

In his Cinema 4D: The Best Tool A Motion Designer Could Ask For presentation, Needham will show you the entire process. From import, to tracking, 3D rotoscoping, modelling, adding 3D objects and particles, and even an introduction to Python.

He’ll even cover some of his favorite tools, like X-Particles and HDRI Studio Rig.

Let’s dive into this Cineversity presentation, and thanks again to Maxon for hosting these speakers at NAB.

Timestamped breakdown courtesy of Cineversity.

00:00 – Intro
02:16 – SHOT: 3D Rotoscope Effect with Crown
03:04 – Mapping Footage onto a Plane
03:23 – Using Content Browser Presets for Head Geometry
04:56 – Modeling a Crown
14:14 – Exactly Position Textures with XPresso
16:03 – SHOT: Selfie
16:52 – Animating a Polaroid with Hand-Drawn Splines
18:12 – Bending the Polaroid
19:52 – Lighting with GSG’s HDRI Studio Rig
20:44 – SHOT: Salute
21:51 – Precision Camera Animation
25:17 – Working with MoSpline
26:00 – SHOT: Magician
26:33 – Object Tracking
28:09 – Adding Particles
30:21 – SHOT: 1… 2… 3.
30:49 – Creating Bubble Text
35:12 – Morphing Spline Shapes
41:01 – Adding Motion Trails
43:16 – Rendering out Passes with Takes
45:57 – Python Development
48:28 – Accesing Objects Relative to the Tag
50:22 – Accessing UserData
50:38 – RangeMapper Function
55:33 – Thank you!
56:11x-particles-challenge.com


More from Andy Needham:

More Cineversity presentations:


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Cineversity Tutorial: Creating Multi-Screen Experiences with C4D

May 4, 2018 - By 
Cineversity Tutorial: Creating Multi Screen Experiences with C4D - featured

Motion designer Sabour Amirazodi shows you how he created a visually stunning multi-screen experience for a Pioneer DJ tradeshow booth.

From NAB 2018, Sabour Amirazodi shows you how he created original content for Pioneer’s tradeshow booth for DJ equipment.

Image via Sabour Amirazodi / Cineversity.

Amirazodi will break down three scenes from the project:

1. Warehouse elevators

Image via Sabour Amirazodi / Cineversity.

2. Time travel

“I figured it would be kind of cool to do a mixing board as the main focal point of this time travel experience…”

Image via Sabour Amirazodi / Cineversity.

“We used a lot of amazing tools for this. Vitaly Bulgarov makes a really cool bashkit… I used a lot of the Greyscalegorilla City Kit to populate the city. I even used Video Copilot’s amazing Saber plugin

It’s using a lot of the tools that these amazing artists have created for us, to make it to where we can go home and spend time with our families, as opposed to creating all these assets from scratch. It really is invaluable, the amount of time these guys put into making our lives a little easier. And more importantly getting these projects done. There’s no way we’d be able to finish this project if it weren’t for these amazing tools.”

3. Pirate ship on the high seas

Image via Sabour Amirazodi / Cineversity.

Throughout the presentation, Amirazodi also shares his strategies for working faster in Cinema 4D. He makes extensive use of preset content and then combines it in ways that are unrecognizable.

Let’s hop into the presentation from Cineversity at the 2018 Maxon Cinema 4D booth.

Here’s a timestamped breakdown courtesy of Cineversity:

01:17 – Project Overview
03:02 – Pirate Scene
05:51 – Setting up a Template for a Non-Standard Format
13:24 – Warehouse Scene
14:19 – Creating an Elevator
17:39 – Kit Bashing
22:44 – Adding Textures and Interior Details
24:05 – Animating the Elevator
29:58 – Pirate Ship
30:53 – Rigging Imported Models
33:54 – Adding Wind to the Sails
39:10 – Creating Ocean
43:20 – Time Travel Scene
47:35 – Animating the Time Machine
49:37 – Adding Cables


More from Sabour Amirazodi:


More Cineversity Presentations:


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Watch This Stunning Tribute to Akira and See How It Was Created

May 3, 2018 - By 
Watch This Stunning Tribute to Akira and See How It Was Created - Pills Cover Feature

Revisit the world of Akira in this must-see short. Plus breakdown the entire process with hours of behind-the-scenes videos.

Designers Ash Thorp and Zaoeyo (XiaoLin Zeng) teamed up to create an absolutely beautiful tribute to Akira. Watch their short, Akira Awaken.

The tribute was a collaborative project that took over a year to create. For those wanting more, there is so much more content.

The Akira Awaken website not only includes the jaw-dropping renders and comparisons to original stills, but also hours of behind-the-scenes breakdowns.

Image via Ash Thorp / Zaoeyo.

Watch as the team shows you what went into creating each shot from the short. They’ll show you their sketches, as well as Cinema 4D and After Effects project files.

Image via Ash Thorp / Zaoeyo.

The guys tell you all about their challenges creating certain scenes, and having to turn to online tutorials and Wikipedia articles to help them learn.

Image via Ash Thorp / Zaoeyo.

Here’s a look at the first breakdown. There are a total of 26! Watch all of the videos on the Process section of the Akira Awaken site.

There are also some on set photos and a breakdown of the team shooting organic fluids for the project.

Image via Ash Thorp / Zaoeyo.

(If you are interested in playing with and compositing these type of fluid elements, I had the pleasure of making some free fluid elements with the team over at RocketStock. You can go download 19 free 4K fluids in their Nebula pack.)

Project Credits:

Be sure to head over to the Akira Awaken website for all the in-depth videos.

Image via Ash Thorp / Zaoeyo.


Want more?

If you are interested in more like this, check out our interview with Ash Thorp, in which he showed us how he created a cyberpunk western for Nike.

GIF via Ash Thorp / NIKE.


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Hands-on Review: Cinema 4D Backlit ASTRA Keyboard

April 4, 2018 - By 
Hands-on Review: Cinema 4D Backlit ASTRA Keyboard - Featured

We test out the backlit Cinema 4D ASTRA keyboard from LogicKeyboard. Do you need one on your desk?

So why am I reviewing a keyboard when there are so many other juicy things to talk about in hardware? I guess because this particular item scratched an itch that’s been bothering me for two years.

When I first started learning Cinema 4D, I was coming from Maya and 3ds Max. To get a leg up on the learning curve, I decided to port most of my shortcuts over to C4D so I could get up and running as fast as possible. It was all going swimmingly until I started realizing that in most of my tutorials I would be hitting hotkeys that made complete sense to me in my Maya/Max mindset, but would be utterly confusing to the C4D artists following along.

Image via LogicKeyboard.

I recently came across LogicKeyboard’s Cinema 4D ASTRA, a keyboard with specific hotkeys printed on each key. Was this keyboard finally my excuse to ditch my patchwork hotkeys and go legit? I reached out to LogicKeyboard, and they were kind enough to send me a unit to review.

Before we get into it, I think you should know that I’m not a mechanical keyboard enthusiast (though this was not for lack of trying). I purchased a Cherry MX3850 and gave mechanical keyboards a shot. After about a week of the clickety-clack lifestyle, I ended up back at my trusty Apple wired keyboard. Yes, I’m on a PC and I use an Apple keyboard. I’m a sucker for both the form factor and the feel of the Mac keys. I don’t like a lot of travel, and I love how quiet it is. With that in mind, here’s what I thought about this scissor-switch Cinema 4D keyboard.

Image via LogicKeyboard.

ASTRA Cinema 4D Keyboard Specs:

  • Backlit keys
  • Dimmable light with five levels
  • Built-in dual USB-ports 2.0
  • Scissor-switch keys
  • Color-coded labelled shortcut keys with graphical commands
  • Compatible with PC and Mac
  • Dimensions – 17 5/8” x 6” x 11/4” (446mm x 150mm x 30mm)
  • Net weight – 2.1 lbs (950 grams)
  • Number of keys – 104 (ANSI version) 105 (ISO version)
  • Manufactured for 10.000.000 keystrokes per key
  • 1.8 meter cable with separate keyboard and hub connections (avoid interference with USB extenders)

First Impressions

I have to say, I was rather impressed by Logickeyboard’s packaging and overall presentation. A clean well-designed box is always a treat to open. Especially those with magnetic clasps that snap shut. Always satisfying. In addition to the keyboard, it shipped with a disposable cleaning wipe and a transparent silicone keyboard cover.

Image via Chad Ashley.

The keyboard itself was larger than I had expected. A few inches longer and deeper than my Apple keyboard. A bit taller as well. The ASTRA has a dual USB plug, one to plug directly into your machine’s keyboard port, and another USB 3 plug that will turn the keyboard into a USB 3.0 hub.

What immediately drew my attention was all of the useful standard Cinema 4D shortcuts printed on all of the keys. It was like looking into a shortcut menu sitting right under your fingers. The printing on the keys is of high quality and well designed overall. When backlit, the ASTRA has several levels of brightness, but no RGB support. I must note that keys do seem uneven in their translucency.

Once I plugged the ASTRA in, I fired up C4D and I was off and running. I simply had to delete my old shortcuts and switch to the C4D default layout.

The Good

Image via Chad Ashley.

Overall, typing on the ASTRA is a reasonably pleasant experience. Key travel and feel was on par with other scissor-switch keyboards I’ve owned. I must say though that the hardware is not what impresses with the ASTRA. The keyboard’s ability to teach me the proper shortcuts in C4D keeps me coming back. It turns out having hotkeys in front of my face and under my fingers is precisely the sort of motivation I needed to legitimize my shortcuts.

I began to transition to the new keys reasonably quickly, and whenever I got stuck a quick glance down would set me straight. I also enjoyed the multiple levels of backlighting. It was helpful to transition to a brighter back when needed. I found myself discovering shortcuts printed on the keys that I had never even known about.

The Not So Good

Image via Chad Ashley.

The biggest problem I had with the ASTRA was the build quality. Several times my right index finger would catch the underside of the “h” key and nearly pop it off. A few other keys also randomly popped off with barely a press. Luckily they could snap right back into place but it was annoying nonetheless.

I personally was not a big fan of the key press feel, which was a bit mushy. My fingers would become fatigued when typing for long periods of time. Its size was not as big of an issue as I had anticipated, but I do wish it were a bit slimmer.

It’s worth mentioning that this keyboard is not easily affordable, with a retail price of $139. At that price, I would have liked to see some dedicated audio controls, or perhaps a slimmer build.

Summary

Image via Chad Ashley.

I’m rather split overall. I would highly recommend the LogicKeyboard ASTRA for anyone wanting to double down on learning the C4D shortcuts. This is a fantastic learning tool, much more useful than a laminated shortcut cheat sheet (which I’ve had my fair share of over the years).

Though it has a well designed look and appeal, the keyboard itself doesn’t really stand out from other traditional keyboards. If you are a big fan of mechanical or scissor-switch keyboards, you likely won’t be stunned by this device.

So if you are ready to commit to being a hotkey master, this might be worth the price tag. The real question is whether or not it stays on your desk when you’re ready to take the training wheels off. I guess I’ll find out soon enough.

You can check out or order the LogicKeyboard Cinema 4D ASTRA keyboard here.


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4 Tips For Engaging Camera Movement in Cinema 4D

March 5, 2018 - By 

Your 3D camera choice is crucial to your composition. Here are four steps in creating a camera that connects with your audience.

Wouldn’t it be great to own every camera and lens ever made? With Cinema 4D, you have exactly that. Your 3D camera choice is just as important as what you are aiming it at. But most of us never change the settings on the default Cinema 4D Camera.

While all the options may be overwhelming, you can learn to master the Cinema 4D camera, and get the exact movements you were envisioning.

1. Choose the right camera setup

A great director knows just what type of camera to use for different types of scenes. Think about your camera move in the same way.

Is this a locked off shot? A crane shot? A handheld scene? Does your camera need to move fast or slow? What is the weight of the camera you need for this shot? Keep this in mind as you start to set up your shot and animate.

2. Choose Your Lens Carefully

Photographers and filmmakers own dozens of different lenses for a reason. Each different focal length brings a different look and emotion to a scene or image. And in 3D, it’s no different. If you are visualizing 3D architecture or setting up a fly through, choose a wider angle lens just like a real estate agent would.

Rendering a product shot? Pick a 50mm or even a 100mm to show off the product and all its angles in their best way.

Cinema 4D’s default camera is a 35mm lens. That’s a bit too wide for most of my renders. I tend to change it to a 50mm to start and in some cases move to a 100mm for product shots and

We’ve put together this tutorial for you to learn more about choosing the right lens for your scene.

3. Match Your Movements To The Camera Type

Remember when you picked what type of camera rig you would use for this scene? This will really help you inform the movement and animation of your camera. Match your movements to the type of camera you are emulating.

Big cameras move slow and give a sense of weight to the scene. Smaller cameras can move faster and get closer to the action. Keep the weight of your rig in mind. A hand held iPhone shot moves way different than a a RED Epic on a Dolly.

4. Add Human Imperfections

Camera moves in real life are rarely perfect. Wind blows, hands shake, and rigs wiggle. Adding natural shake and imperfections to your Cinema 4D camera will help “sell” your animation.

Even a big of shake and drift can give your scene that realistic human touch that will help give your animation that natural feel and help pull more attention from your eventual audience.

You can certainly add these imperfections yourself, but this is a very tedious and time consuming process. If you have the time to add some shakes or overshoots, go for it. If you are on a tight deadline, you should check out our GorillaCam plugin. You can instantly add realistic camera movement in seconds. What would normally take days to program, you can now achieve in minutes with GorillaCam.






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